Communications Plan

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 114
  • Published : February 12, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
COMMUNICATIONS PLAN
Project Manager
Brandon Patterson
10/21/2012
Version:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRELIMINARIES03
Context and Project Background03
Stakeholder Analysis03
CONMMUNICATION PLAN11
Communication Objectives11
Communication Plan- Appendix 113
Routine Communication - Appendix 113
APPROVAL12
WORKS CITED18

PRELIMINARIES

Context and Project Background

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and TSA awarded a $37m grant for expansion projects at Denver International Airport. These funds are being used for the master plan projects. Approximately $11.6m will go towards rehabilitating runway 8/26, and over $1.7m will be used to improve the taxiway system surrounding Jeppesen Terminal. About $8.7m will be used to upgrade runway 16L/34R. About $15m from the TSA grant will be spent on improving the airport's baggage screening system. Stakeholder Analysis

To examine the role of the airport stakeholders a precise definition of stakeholders and their goals for the airport is necessary. The purpose of this section is to identify the airport’s goals from the point of view of each stakeholder group. 1) Passengers

For passengers, the airport provides a transition point between the ground and air transportation modes, or a connection point between two flights. Different sub-types of passengers have been identified (Neufville & Odoni 2003): 1) Arriving passengers

2) Originating passengers
3) Transfer passengers
4) International and domestic passengers
5) Charter and low-fare airline passengers
6) Shuttle/commuter passengers
These passenger types are not mutually exclusive; rather, an individual passenger may be a member of more than one subtype of passenger categories. Arriving and originating passengers are commonly referred to as origin and destination (O&D) passengers. Independent of the passenger classifications according to the above attributes, the passengers may be viewed in two different capacities in the context of this analysis. First, passengers can be viewed as participants in the economic system, either as business travelers or as tourist/leisure travelers, purchasing services from airport service providers and interacting in different ways with local businesses and the local community. Second, passengers can be viewed as individual travelers that have expectations about receiving quality services, and passing through the airport system in a convenient manner. These two perspectives have different implications on the goals for the airports and will be treated separately in the following subsections. a) Passengers as Economic Participants

Passengers may participate in the economic system in one of several ways: 1) As origin leisure/personal travelers: These are passengers from the local community that use the airport as their departure point for leisure or other personal travel. 2) As origin business travelers: These are travelers representing local businesses, using the airport as their departure point. 3) As destination leisure/personal travelers: These are visitors to the region, for tourism or other personal purposes. 4) As destination business travelers: These are business travelers coming to visit local businesses. If the airport’s traffic is heavily geared toward O&D traffic, then demand at the airport is more heavily dictated by the local economy. In contrast, significant connecting (transfer) passenger levels are less sensitive to the performance of the local economy, but those traffic volumes may represent vulnerability for the airport since they are to a greater degree dictated by a carrier’s viability and route decisions. Passengers contribute toward the financing of airport capital improvement projects through Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs) of up to $4.50 per passenger. PFCs are paid directly by passengers through airline tickets and proceeds must be used for capital improvements at the...
tracking img