You’ve typed those two precious words “The End,” but now you’re faced with the tedious task of creating bibliographies. Ugh. With our free and easy-to-use citation generator, there is no more “ugh.” Automatically create bibliographies in the format you want, including APA, MLA and Chicago styles. Go ahead. Give it a whirl.

Web
1. Enter Article, Website and Author
2. Choose Citation Style
3. Your Citation

Book
1. Enter Book, Article and Author
2. Choose Citation Style
3. Your Citation

Newspaper
1. Enter Newspaper, Article and Author
2. Choose Citation Style
3. Your Citation

Journal
1. Enter Journal, Article and Author
2. Choose Citation Style
3. Your Citation

Magazine
1. Enter Magazine, Article and Author
2. Choose Citation Style
3. Your Citation

Clear

How to Write a Bibliography

It's always important to cite the information you find and use in your work. If you don't, you could easily be charged with plagiarism. That's why learning how to construct a bibliography (also referred to as a reference page or works cited page) is critical to your academic success. The following highlights three common citation styles, how to use Microsoft Word's citation features and some tips and helpful links.

MLA

The Modern Language Association (MLA) is a popular style used for citing sources in the liberal arts and humanities. As a college undergraduate, this is the most likely citation style you'll run into. In the physical text of your paper, you'll want to include the author's name. Find more information at the Purdue OWL MLA Style section.

Examples of Reference Page

Basic Book Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication.

Article in a Scholarly Journal:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume.Issue (Year): page-page. Medium of Publication.

Page on a Website:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of Article." Website.com. Website Name, Date Published. Web. 5 Jan. 2012.

APA

Used mainly in the social sciences, the American Psychological Association (APA) style puts an emphasis on the date of a work. Find more information at the Purdue OWL APA Style section.

Examples of Reference Page

Basic Book Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Name (Year of Publication). Title of book: Capitalize first word of subtitle. Location: Publisher.

Article in a Scholarly Journal:

Author Last Name, Author First Name (Year of Publication). Title of article: Capitalize first word of subtitle. Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), page-page.

Page on a Website:

Author Last Name, Author First Name Initial. (Year Published, Month Published). Title of article: Capitalize first word of subtitle. Website.com. Retrieved from http://www.yourlink.com

Chicago

History courses will often have you use the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS). One of the biggest differences between CMS and other styles is that CMS uses footnotes and endnotes. Find more information at the Purdue OWL Chicago section.

Examples of Reference Page

Basic Book Format:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication.

Article in a Scholarly Journal:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical Volume.Issue (Year): page-page.

Page on a Website:

Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Title of Article." Website.com. http://www.yourlink.com

Using Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word can be extremely helpful in crafting a bibliography once you know how to use it. The first step is to go to the "References" tab. This is where you can add a Table of Contents and insert endnotes and footnotes (helpful when using the Chicago Manual of Style).

However, most useful will be the "Citations & Bibliography" section. It allows you to build a bibliography with formatting help from Word. Choose the style you want to use, click "Insert Citation" and fill out the information. From here, Word will even let you manage all the sources you insert.

Tips

  • Always pay attention to formatting.
  • Check your school's library website for citation resources.
  • Keep track of your sources when you begin your research.
  • If you're not sure which citation style to use, ask.
  • Double-space your bibliography.