What Gets Measured Gets Done

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 49
  • Published : November 27, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
There is some truth to the statement "what gets measured gets done" with respect to the work environment, discuss.

I believe the maxim “what gets measured gets done” (accredited to among others, Peter Drucker in his 1954 book 'The Practice of Management') does hold a semblance of truth when associated within the business world. However, I would argue that the sentence in itself is incomplete. Between the ‘measuring’ and ‘getting done’, mangers need to insert both critical analysis of the measurements and appropriate action upon reflection of that analysis. Or as Price’s dictum states: No inspection or measurement without proper recording; No recording without analysis; No analysis without action. (Frank Price, Right first time. 1984) There is a folly that measuring effectiveness will improve performance. But metrics on their own are meaningless without the analysis and resulting action, followed by a period of monitoring in order to compare results.

If we take the title maxim to include the missing analysis and actions as discussed, then the phrase holds not only a strong, but a vital premise in the immediate and continued success of a business. “Businesses that succeed and make money constantly assess themselves and improve in all dimensions of their business; metrics are the cornerstone of their assessment, and the foundation for any business improvement”. (CFO Magazine 1995) Indeed the very foundations of most business ventures lay in detailed measurements and analysis, in order to ascertain a potential gap in the market or a need for a product or service. Therefore, if a start-up uses metrics to establish its business, it would make sense for it to incorporate a systematic continuation of these and further measurements in order to promote its sustainability and growth.

Before using metrics within business you need an understanding of what you are measuring and why. Measuring for measurement sake is a waste of time. Managers should only use...
tracking img