Should Be Single Sex Education

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Children’s happiness is one of the the most important things when selecting a school. Equally important is finding a school that is inspiring. Parents also need to consider other factors such as letting them be themselves, academic skills and avoid sexual distractions of adolescence. Anyway, children have different needs and styles of learning. Thereby this essay will argue that schools should be single sex education. Obviously single sex education can understand how their students learn and they adapt their teaching styles to those specific needs. Some people believe that coeducation seems to be more realistic refers to provides greater opportunities for socialization.

Besides the fact that children have different needs and the respect of personal differences. Directed intuitively and affectively oriented style of learning that fits most women never compatible. How to structure and practices that attract men single sex education helps teachers adjust instruction to male model and facilitate the study rounded up, unnecessary for boys to choose the course of the area they will produced. Keise (1992, p.9) argues that single sex education has benefits for girls offers more opportunities to exercise leadership because girls have to hold positions of leadership in schools such as drama, sports, annual report or discussion of the team. It make it easier for girls to be leaders also boys tent to dominate and overshadow equally talented girls. Obviously it gives them expended education opportunities by allowing them to pressure non-traditional disciplines for girls suck as mathematics or sciences. Furthermore about emotion, single sex education puts less pressure on girls because girls are more prone than boys to suffer from low self esteem.

This is clarified by The York Times Company (2010) who identifies the benefits of single sex education is mainly what you make them if your child learn to achieve his goals and is not afraid to compete if she knows that she can be whatever she wants to be, and you can attribute some of those feelings and achievement to the leanings environment she was in high school. Unfortunately the numbers schools with single sex education are small that it easy to determine simply.

Moreover, boys and girls learn in difference ways. Boys use the brain for a given activity. In addition, physical differences lead to differences in the way boys and girls learn. Emotional activity is also processed in a different part of the brain. It has been suggested that girls respond more innately to literature. If the teacher understands how to teach girls, they will quickly feel comfortable exploring non-tradition subjects as mathematics, sciences, computers also technology and boys participate learn Lartin in single sex education. Moreover, Rowland (1974, p. 110) argues that men teacher teach mathematics and science better than woman as well as woman teach arts subjects better than man furthermore the mixed staff produce harmonious in the school.

Furthermore, Mullins (2005) maintains that children in single sex education participate more in class, develop higher self esteem, score higher in aptitude tests, are chossing sciences and other male domains at teriary level, and are in more successful on careers. This research suggests that boys and girls have differences and there the best way to teach them is with different methods or environment.

Children in single sex education provide parents with an opportunity can make more effectively the social development of their children. It makes more effectively the social development of their children. It makes an easier to study about sex education. Parents need their children are initiative to provide social development. Of course they should set opportunities for boys to mix a girls in family setting during childhood. If girls do not study in single sex education, it is quite hard for girls to have leadership skills.

In addition, Gill (2004, p. 79) argues...
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