Single Sex Schooling

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 49
  • Published : August 3, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Major arguments are weather single sex schools district would increase confidence and self esteem, increase academic test scores and grades, and increase students socially. There should be single sex public school districts. Single-Sex Schools have been discriminated against by many due to the belief that students will not be able to function comfortably with the opposite sex when leaving to attend a co-educational College or University. This belief is also tied with the thought that single-sex schools represent segregation; many people do believe that these types of schools promote the separation of males and females. Some also believe that all single-sex schools result in people not being able to function socially with opposite gender when place in the real world. However, all of these beliefs are far from the truth. Studies have shown that attending single-sex schools can be very beneficial in succeeding both academically and socially. Gender-separate format can boost grades and test scores for both girls and boys (Haag, 2000). Single-Sex education is especially beneficial for young females and young males. This type of education offers both genders a more comfortable way of learning, students feel more comfortable asking questions and speaking up in a classroom setting. Teachers can focus on gender issues facing young females or males today, such as body concerns as well as focusing on more challenging subjects for young girls and boys (Messinger, 2001). Through studies made from various single-sex female schools, as well as the research made through comparisons to coeducational schools, the belief that single-sex school as being a bad idea is shown to be not only incorrect, but also a completely misguided beliefs.

One point of argument is whether single sex schooling will increase confidence and self esteem. This issue ----Unfortunately, for many adolescent and teenage girls, eating disorders and body concerns are very prevalent. However, according to a study made by Janel Messinger, The Truth about Single- Sex Schooling representative from the Department of psychology at the City University of New York, single-sex schooling is shown to have fewer cases of eating disorders compared to co-ed schools. Messinger states that the body image and eating disturbances are due to a sense of gender ambivalence resulting from increased exposure to conflicting gender role prescription (Messinger, 2001). This statement is saying that when young females are in a mixed environment it is hard to determine what is a healthy image and what is not. James Coleman, author of “The Adolescent Society”, also shares the belief that body concerns play a major role in a co-ed environment. Coleman states that co-educational schools create an environment of dating and popularity being more important than education (Dollison, 1998). For females especially appearance plays a major role in adolescents. To be in an environment with the opposite sex seems to increase this pressure; thus making schoolwork and education play a much lesser role. While attending a single-sex school, girls have a decreased chance of being exposed to sex-role stereotyping (Messinger, 5). These stereotypes of how females should be create many girls to do anything to achieve perfection even if this does mean hurting their education in the process. Throughout middle school and high school, many females begin to suffer from not only body issues, but also poor self-esteem. However, studies have been conducted on the self-esteem of females in single-sex and mixed-sex schools. These studies have been made by processing not just general self-esteem, but rather more multidimensional measures in categories such as academic, athletic, and social esteem (Haag, 2). A study made from British journalist E.Cairns, found that, self-esteem and the locus of control (meaning the individual sense of how the environment hinders or facilitates to personal goals), are shown to be associated as...
tracking img