Dana Hall Co-Educational .Doc

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  • Topic: Education, Gender, History of education
  • Pages : 3 (946 words )
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  • Published : April 12, 2011
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In trying to put myself in the position of the new director of Dana Hall Elaine Betts, the question that must be addressed to the mission review committee is should Dana Hall embrace co-education as opposed to single-sex education for their all girl boarding school?

Right now it appears that given how strong some of the individuals in leadership feel as well as the teachers of the school that Dana Hall should remain a single-sex educational system.
Elaine Betts must submit to the mission review committee the pros and cons of the issue so they can make a solid decision based on all the facts. What follows are the results of her research. Claims for Single-Sex Education

According to Education Bug (2011) there are some important claims made for single-sex over co-ed education to help one know the possible advantages and issues are. As you read, keep in mind that there are true believers arguing on both sides of this issue, and that the best school is one that is a good match for a particular child at a particular time of their life (p.1).

First boys and girls learn differently. It has been proven that girls and boys have different patterns of brain development, brain processing is different, and in specific has a different relationship to the center of emotion. They also have differentiated hearing sensitivity and respond to stress in different ways and that their differences can best be responded to by differentiating their instruction and learning environment (Education Bug, 2011, p.1). Some studies have shown that both male and female students who have been educated in single-sex environments have a stronger preference for subjects that are stereotypically aligned with the opposite sex. Teachers also may treat girls differently from boys in math, science, and computer related classes, giving them less attention and fewer learning opportunities. This kind of favoritism would be impossible in a single-sex classroom (Education Bug, 2011, p.1)....
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