Product Design

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Product Design & Development

Concept Generation

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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Concept Generation Example: Power Nailer
• What existing solution concepts, if any, could be successfully adapted for this application? • What new concepts might satisfy the established needs and specifications? • What methods can be used to facilitate the concept generation process?

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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Concept Development Process
Mission Statement Identify Customer Needs Establish Target Specifications Generate Product Concepts Select Product Concept(s) Test Product Concept(s) Set Final Specifications Plan Downstream Development Development Plan

Perform Economic Analysis Benchmark Competitive Products Build and Test Models and Prototypes

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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The Activity of Concept Generation
• A good concept is sometimes poorly implemented in subsequent development phases, but a poor concept can rarely be manipulated to achieve commercial success. • Concept generation typically consumes less than 5% budget and 15% of the development time • Because the concept genaration activity is not costly, there is no excuse for lack of diligence and care in executing asound concept 4 generation method.

Preliminary questions
After identifying customer needs and establishing target product specifications, the team should ask: • What existing solutions could be adapted for this application? • What new concepts might satisfy these needs and specifications? • What methods can be used to facilitate concept generation process? ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt 5

Concept generation activity
• Structured approaches reduce the likelihood of costly problems – Common dysfunctions during concept generation:
– Consideration of only one or two alternatives, often proposed by the most assertive members of the team. – Failure to consider carefully the usefulness of concepts employed by other firms in related and unrelated products. – Involvement of only one or two people in the process, resulting in lack of confidence and commitment by other team members. – Ineffective integration of promising partial solutions. – Failure to consider entire categories of solutions. ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt 6

A Five-Step Method
• • • • • Step 1: Clarify the Problem Step 2: Search Externally Step 3: Search Internally Step 4: Explore Systematically Step 5: Reflect on the Results and the Process

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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Concept Generation Process
2. Search externally 1. Clarify the problem • Understanding • Problem decomposition • Focus on critical subproblems • • • • • Lead users Experts Patents Literature Benchmarking EXISTING CONCEPTS

4. Explore systematically • Classification tree • Combination table INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS

3. Search internally • Individual • Group

5. Reflect on solution and process
NEW CONCEPTS

• Constructive feedback
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SUBPROBLEMS

The nailer: Step 1
Review assumptions underlying mission statement The nailer will: – use nails (as opposed to adhesives, screws etc.). – be compatible with nail magazines on existing tools. – nail into wood. – be hand-held. ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt 9

Customer needs
• Customer needs (for a hand-held nailer):
– The nailer inserts nails in rapid succession. – The nailer works into tight spaces – The nailer is lightweight. – The nailer has no noticeable nailing delay after tripping tool.

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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Target specifications
• No noticeable nailing delay after pulling trigger • Nail lengths from 25 to 38 mm. • Maximum nailing energy of 40 J/nail. • Nailing force of up to 2,000 N. • Peak nailing rate of 12 nails/second.

ETM 551 Lecture 5 -Concept Generation.ppt

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Target specifications (cont)
• • • • Average nailing rate of 4 nails/min. Maximum trigger delay of 0.25 second. Tool mass less...
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