Planning a Successful Event

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Summary

This report looks into the planning process of a food and drink festival held in Leeds. The report will be analysing the stages of the planning process chosen for this particular event, and it will be specifying the sector of the market in which will be targeted to attract to the festival. It will also be discussing issues which may occur before, during and after the event and how it is best dealt with to overcome any problems which may be endured. It will include how to best promote the event by advertisement and how it will influence the attendance and success of the event. It will also show how other events like the food and drink festival in Manchester, the East Midlands and in York have been a success and how through that we can assume that the festival in Leeds will also be successful.

Contents Page

Section.Title.Page.

Summary.i.

Contents.ii.

1. Introduction.1

2. Event Planning Process Model2.

Bowdin et al. 2001 2.

Negative impacts of the model 3.

3. Research4

3.1 Food and Drink Festivals4.

3.2 Public Opinions4.

3.3 Advertising nationally 5.

4. Customers Needs6.

5. Logistical Issues and Solutions7.

5.1 Post Event7.

5.2 During the Event8.

6. Evaluating the Event9. 7. Reference List10.

1. Introduction
There a range of event planning models within the events industry which have two main features; strategic and operational. Each have their own different strengths and weaknesses and it is dependent on the organiser which model will be best suited to the particular event that they will planning. Planning an event is extremely important as it enables the organiser to foresee any problems which they may endure and find a suitable solution to the problems before they occur. It is very important to have management and leadership skills in organising an event so that various roles can be delegated to members of staff so that the event runs as smoothly as possible and minimalise any hiccups which can occur. The more organised an event is, generally the more successful the outcome will be and less change and improvisation will had to be done on the day of the event. George Torkildsen wrote “ to provide the right facilities, in the best location, at the right time, for the people that need them at an acceptable cost” is what will make the event a success and hopefully this report will be demonstrating just this.

2. The Event Planning Process Model
The planning process model decided on for this event is Bowdin et al’s 2001 event model. It is a clear and definitive model which separates the planning process in to two individual processes: Strategical and Operational. The strategic plan will highlight any problems which may incur during the event and therefore from following this plan they will be identified and a solution will be found in order to prevent them from occurring. The operational plan indicates what needs to be done to ensure the running of the event goes smoothly, for example the policies and rules will help to ensure the event is a success and having job descriptions will ensure that everyone will know what to do and what role they have in the event for it to be a success.

2.1Bowdin et al. 2001
A
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2.2Negative impacts of this model
Although this model has been chosen in order to assure that the event will run according to plan it was not a definitive choice. It does have some negative impacts which will have to be considered whilst organising the event. It does not have as much detail as some of the other models which could have been used in the planning of the festival. For example Getz’s 2005 model from ‘Project planning for a one-time event’.

B
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This model goes in to slightly more depth than...
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