Management and Organisation

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UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SYDNEY
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FACULTY OF BUSINESS
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Graduate School of Business
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Management & Organisations - 21800
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Student Name: Arijit Banerjee
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Student Number: 11294636
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Lecture Day:Monday 9 AM to 12 PM
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Lecturer:Dr. Walter Jarvis
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Tutor:Ms. Alison Lee
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UTS: BUSINESS SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

PART A:
The educational system in any country around the world is, by no doubt, designed to meet the ever growing hunger of Industrialization. Dubbed by Sir Ken Robinson (2010) as “the fast food model”, this educational system, albeit useful in shaping the world that we all see today, has had some significantly negative impact on the lives of some people who were forced to be a victim of this system. It is indeed true and I agree with the fact that there are many people in this world who often forego their talents and creative abilities in order to be a part of this so called industrial model (Robinson 2010). Why does this happen? Why don’t people simply pursue a specific talent that they possess? The reason is very simple. Those talents are not worth much to the society. In other words, they cannot make a career out of those talents so to speak. Those are unaccepted and unprofessional talents that do not fit into the industrial model the entire world today is built upon. A very harmful output of this industrial or fast food model is growing competition. Today, there is a sense of cut-throat competition and it is manifest in anything that would lead to a financially rewarding career and societal recognition. Be it an employment or a better education opportunity, candidates are grinded to what I would call, their uncomfortably worst, in order for the system to selectively pick the best of the lot. Indeed, the phrase “survival of the fittest” is practiced in every essence of life. People are increasingly pressurised to learn and harness new skills in order to survive the war against this growing competition. And it is indeed a shame that this dreadful competition is applied even to children as young as three (Robinson 2010). Parent’s increasing concern about the future of their children brings in a sense of fear among the latter, as a result of which they start to deviate from their passion, compromising their talents in order to pledge themselves to the industrial model. I find this as a complete injustice to society in general and feel that there needs to be a change in this particular model that we are used to. According to Sir Ken Robinson (2006), “the whole purpose of public education is to produce university professors”. In my opinion, this is not completely true. We need some fundamental education in any skilled job to be successful enough to do that job. Being a professor is a choice of an individual and it cannot be generalised that the profession of teaching as the only choice one has after taking public education. However, I do agree with Robinson’s concerns that there should be a revolution in education. We have to change from the industrial...
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