Quotation and Citation

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Quoting and Integrating Quotes
1. Cite quotations and borrowed ideas.
Research paper is a collaboration between you and your sources. To be fair and ethical, you must acknowledge your debt to the writers of those sources. When you acknowledge your sources, you avoid plagiarism, a serious academic offense. Sources are cited for two reasons.

1. To tell readers where your information comes from – so that they can assess its reliability and, if interested, find and read the original source. 2. To give credit to the writers from whom you have borrowed words and ideas. You must cite anything you borrow from a source, including direct quotations; statistics and other specific facts; visuals such as cartoons, graphs, and diagrams; and any ideas you present in a summary or paraphrase.

2. Quotation Marks Usage Chart
Quote a phrase. When quoting someone word-for-word, use quotation marks to show the reader exactly which words are being borrowed from a particular source. This is especially important in research writing. For example: Gilder states that "bandwidth grows at least three times faster than computer power."—"Musings on Moore's Law and Other Laws of Technology" by Robert Swider and Dennis Kambury[1]

3. Use quotations appropriately
When to use quotations:
* When language is especially vivid or expressive
* When exact wording in needed for technical accuracy
* When it is important to let the debates of an issue explain their positions in their own words * When the words of an authority lend weight to an argument * When the language of a source is the topic of your discussion (as in an analysis or interpretation)
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