A Tale of Two Cities

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A Tale of two cities
This novel begins with comparing the situation of England and France, during the French Revolution. I think that Charles Dickens wanted to show what could happen in one’s life and how a person could sacrifice himself for the one he loves. So I am going to tell about the characters and my point of view of the novel. First, Lucie Manett, who marries Charles Darnay, is a kind and loving person. The author described her as a golden-haired, blue-eyed and a being beautiful both physically and spiritually. Her character binds many of the characters. She represents a woman with a good taste, a woman who inspires a great love and loyalty. Second, Charles Darnay- a French nobleman who originates from a French rich family but cruel and mean. I think that Charles Darnay represents justice and duty, despite the fact that he’s from a rich family, he preferred to start a new life in London as a tutor because he thought his family was cruel and he wanted to live a peaceful life without being hated by the people because of his family. Although he wanted to be away from all the scandals in France, he couldn’t and he ended up being in France prison and was saved by Sydney Carton. He falls in love with Lucie Manett and marries her. Next, Sydney Carton, who loves Lucie but prefers to be not too close with her because he thinks that he is a ruined man. In addition, he promised Lucie to do anything for her and he did in the end. He is an intelligent, good looking man; in fact, he looks a lot like Charles Darnay. In my opinion, he is the hero of our story, sacrificing his life for her. Comparing Sydney Carton and Charles Darnay, they are both intelligent and good looking. Charles Darnay has all the good things, including Lucie; however, Sydney has the rough end of the stick. In the end of the novel, Sydney Carton dies instead of Darnay, sacrificing himself for the good of Lucie. Before his death, Sydney’s very last thoughts were “It is a far, far better thing...
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