A Meta-Analysis of the Relationships Between Individual Job Satisfaction and Individual Performance

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A Meta-Analysis of the Relationships between Individual Job Satisfaction and Individual Performance Author(s): M. M. Petty, Gail W. McGee, Jerry W. Cavender Source: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 9, No. 4 (Oct., 1984), pp. 712-721 Published by: Academy of Management Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/258493 Accessed: 20/10/2010 04:45 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=aom. Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

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0Academy of Management Review, 1984, Vol 9, No. 4, 712-721.

A

Meta-Analysis of Between Individual and Individual

the Relationships Job Satisfaction Performance1

M. M. PETTY GAIL W. MCGEE JERRY W. CAVENDER

Universityof Alabama
literature Thecorrelational the concerning relationships betweenindividual job satisfactionand individual performancewasanalyzed,usingthe metaanalysistechniquesof Hunter, Schmidt,and Jackson (1982). Higher and more consistentcorrelationsbetweenoveralljob satisfactionand performancewereindicated thanthosepreviouslyreported. Relationships between JDI measuresof job satisfactionand performancewerenot as high or as consistent thosefound betweenoverall satisfaction performance. as job and Perhaps the most controversial issue that has evolved from decades of research on employee attitudes and employee behavior is the job satisfactionjob performancerelationship. More than two decades of organizational research have been devoted to understanding the satisfaction-performance relationship; yet, the issue has remained unresolved. Although empirical efforts to unravel the satisfactionperformance dilemma have diminished in recent years, the controversy has remained alive (Johns, 1983; Schermerhorn, Hunt, & Osborn, 1982; Steers, 1981). The decline in the growth rate of labor productivity during the last two decades (Capdevielle, Alvarez, & Cooper, 1982) in combination with the results of two national surveys of American workers that have indicated a widespread decline in job satisfaction (Cooper, Morgan, Foley, & Kaplan, 1979; Quinn & Staines, 1978) also have intensified interest in the nature of the relationship.

to the satisfaction-performance relationship:
1. Satisfactioncauses performance (s-p) 2. Performancecauses satisfaction(p-s) 3. The satisfaction-performancerelationship is moderatedby a numberof other variables.

SatisfactionCauses Performance Theviewpoint satisfaction that causesperformance has its roots in human relations theory, which emerged from the Hawthorne studies of the late 1920sand early 1930s(Filley, House, & Kerr, 1976; Schwab& Cummings,1970).Vroomstatedthat "it wastypically assumedby mostpeopleassociated with the humanrelationsmovementthatjob satisfaction was positivelyassociatedwith job performance.In fact human relationsmight be describedas an attemptto increase productivity satisfying...
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