Work Place Equality

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Research on Gender Equality in the Workplace
Nganyang Mbote Ngatta
AMBA 620
UMUC
08/22/2010

ABSTRACT

In 1967, the passage of Title VII of the Civil Right Act also established a federal administrative agency, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), to prohibit discrimination in employment; to hire or fire and compensate workers as well as to monitor employers, compliance with the law. This paper analyses the moral impact of gender inequality at the promotional level of jobs, despising job performance. The effects of this discrimination could either be direct or indirect. In this paper, I also highlights the role of decision making as well as the ethical dilemma involved organizational management. Most importantly, this paper demonstrates the fact that the law is not a panacea to gender inquality, it only helps in shaping organizational behavior; a greater responsibility depends on the structure of the occupational hierarchy. Based on the above determinant, recommendations will be presented to foster gender equality.

One of the significant impacts of globalization is that business organizations operate across cultures. Depending on how management responds to different values and beliefs, cultural diversity may substantially affect an organization’s performance (Blanchard, 1998; Stodder, 1998). Gender equality is a long established priority for the European Union (EU) and is also integral to its sustainability strategy. While significant progress in advancing gender equality has been made, in particular through the implementation of the policy of gender mainstreaming (GM), there is still a long way to go to achieve equality (Grosser, 2009). One of the major challenges is to stimulate more progress on the part of social partners, and in particular companies (Grosser, 2009). Many definitions have been submitted for gender equality, however, in this situation gender equality will be defined according to the European Union (EU) as; an equal visibility, empowerment and participation of both sexes in all spheres of public and private life. It is not synonymous with sameness, with establishing men, their life style and conditions as the norm, it means accepting and valuing equally the difference between women and men and the diverse roles they play in society (Council of Europe, 1998:7-8). Although there are some universal values such as honesty, fairness and not harming others, the concept of what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ varies across national boundaries and even countries consisting of different cultures (Schwartz, 2002). I had a female friend who expressed her plight and frustrations to me ever so often. She could not stop expressing disgruntlement when it came to her position (job). She had been working for a company a little over six years, with an excellent work record and recommendations. Yet she was not promoted to the level of manger. Her anger and frustration compounded because all male employee who were hired after her were promoted after three years of service. To this effect I was interested to research on gender equality in the work place. This paper will present the moral implications of organizations which fail to invoke gender equality for legitimate promotion, examine aspects of promotion, managers’ responses and then finally recommendations to reduce and possibly eliminate this pandemic.

The jobs people do are a key determinants of their earnings, their opportunities for advancement, their work conditions, their access to benefits, the cultural valuation of their work, and a host of other workplace-mediated rewards (Cohen & Huffman, 2003; Glass, 1990; Jacobs & Steinberg, 1990; Kalleberg, Reskin & Hudson, 2000; Maume, 1999; Peterson & Morgan, 1995; Tomaskovic-Devey, 1993). Occupational segregation thus provides a composite measure of equality and opportunity in workplace (Hirsh, 2009). Against this backdrop, the impact of gender inequality could be...
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