Thesis

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  • Topic: Thesis or dissertation, Data, Section
  • Pages : 15 (4790 words )
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  • Published : January 31, 2013
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How to Write Your Thesis
compiled by Kim Kastens, Stephanie Pfirman, Martin Stute, Bill Hahn, Dallas Abbott, and Chris Scholz   
I. Thesis structure| II. Crosscutting Issues| III. Editing Your Thesis|  | Title Page|  | What We Are Looking For|  | Copy Editing|  | Abstract|  | Planning Ahead for Your Thesis|  | Content Editing|  | Table of Contents|  | Writing for an Audience|  | Avoiding Ambiguity|  | List of Figures|  | Skimming vs. Reading|  | Thesis Length|  | List of Tables|  | Order of Writing|  | Writing for an International Audience|  | Introduction|  | Figures and Tables|  |

 | Methods|  | Tying the Text to the Data| |
 | Results|  | Giving Credit| |
 | Discussion|  | Final Thesis | |
 | Conclusions|  | Resources| |
 | Recommendations|  | | |
 | Acknowledgments|  | | |
 | References|  |  | |
| Appendices| | | | |
I. Thesis structure
Title Page
Title (including subtitle), author, institution, department, date of delivery, research mentor(s) and advisor, their instututions and email adresses   
Abstract * A good abstract explains in one line why the paper is important. It then goes on to give a summary of your major results, preferably couched in numbers with error limits. The final sentences explain the major implications of your work. A good abstract is concise, readable, and quantitative.  * Length should be ~ 1-2 paragraphs, approx. 400 words.  * Absrtracts generally do not have citations. * Information in title should not be repeated.  * Be explicit.  * Use numbers where appropriate. * Answers to these questions should be found in the abstract:  1. What did you do?  2. Why did you do it? What question were you trying to answer?  3. How did you do it? State methods. 4. What did you learn? State major results.  5. Why does it matter? Point out at least one significant implication.|

Table of Contents * list all headings and subheadings with page numbers * indent subheadings * it will look something like this:|

| Page #|
List of Figures| xxx|
List of Tables|  |
Introduction  
     subheads ...?|  |
Methods  
     subheads ...?|  |
Results  
     subheads ...? |  |
Discussion  
     subheads ...? |  |
Conclusion|  |
Recommendations|  |
Acknowledgments|  |
References|  |
Appendices|  |
List of Figures
List page numbers of all figures.
The list should include a short title for each figure but not the whole caption.  

List of Tables
List page numbers of all tables.
The list should include a short title for each table but not the whole caption.  

Introduction
You can't write a good introduction until you know what the body of the paper says. Consider writing the introductory section(s) after you have completed the rest of the paper, rather than before. Be sure to include a hook at the beginning of the introduction. This is a statement of something sufficiently interesting to motivate your reader to read the rest of the paper, it is an important/interesting scientific problem that your paper either solves or addresses. You should draw the reader in and make them want to read the rest of the paper. The next paragraphs in the introduction should cite previous research in this area. It should cite those who had the idea or ideas first, and should also cite those who have done the most recent and relevant work. You should then go on to explain why more work was necessary (your work, of course.)   

What else belongs in the introductory section(s) of your paper?  1. A statement of the goal of the paper: why the study was undertaken, or why the paper was written. Do not repeat the abstract.  2. Sufficient background information to allow the reader to understand the context and significance of the question you are trying to address.  3. Proper acknowledgement of the previous work on which you are...
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