Talent Management Project

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CHAPTER-I
PART-A
INTRODUCTION

Talent Management implies recognizing a person's inherent skills, traits, personality and offering him a matching job. Every person has a unique talent that suits a particular job profile and any other position will cause discomfort. It is the job of the Management, particularly the HR Department, to place candidates with prudence and caution. A wrong fit will result in further hiring, re-training and other wasteful activities.

Talent Management is beneficial to both the organization and the employees. The organization benefits from: Increased productivity and capability; a better linkage between individuals' efforts and business goals; commitment of valued employees; reduced turnover; increased bench strength and a better fit between people's jobs and skills. Employees benefit from: Higher motivation and commitment; career development; increased knowledge about and contribution to company goals; sustained motivation and job satisfaction.

In these days of highly competitive world, where change is the only constant factor, it is important for an organization to develop the most important resource of all – the Human Resource. In this globalized world, it is only the Human Resource that can provide an organization the competitive edge because under the new trade agreements, technology can be easily transferred from one country to another and there is no dearth for sources of cheap finance. But it is the talented workforce that is very hard to find.

HISTORY OF TALENT MANAGEMENT
Talent Management is a process that emerged in the 1990s and continues to be adopted, as more companies come to realize that their employees’ talents and skills drive their business success. Companies that have put into practice Talent Management have done so to solve an employee retention problem. The issue with many companies today is that their organizations put tremendous effort into attracting employees to their company, but spend little time into retaining and developing talent. A Talent Management System must be worked into the business strategy and implemented in daily processes throughout the company as a whole. It cannot be left solely to the human resources department to attract and retain employees, but rather must be practiced at all levels of the organization. The business strategy must include responsibilities for line managers to develop the skills of their immediate subordinates. Divisions within the company should be openly sharing information with other departments in order for employees to gain knowledge of the overall organizational objectives.[4] Companies that focus on developing their talent integrate plans and processes to track and manage their employee talent, including the following: Sourcing, attracting and recruiting qualified candidates with competitive backgrounds

• Managing and defining competitive salaries.
• Training and development opportunities.
• Performance management processes.
• Retention programs.
• Promotion and transitioning
Talent Management is also known as HCM (Human Capital Management), HRIS (HR Information Systems) or HRMS (HR Management Systems), and HR Module. MEANING OF TALENT MANAGEMENT
The term "talent management" means different things to different organizations. To some it is about the management of high-worth individuals or "the talented" whilst to others it is about how talent is managed generally - i.e. on the assumption that all people have talent which should be identified and liberated. From a Talent Management stand point, employee evaluations concern two major areas of measurement: performance and potential. Current employee performance within a specific job has always been a standard evaluation measurement tool of the profitability of an employee. However, Talent Management also seeks to focus on an employee’s potential, meaning an employee’s future performance, if given the proper...
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