Strategic Change Management

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IRISH BUSINESS SCHOOL DUBLIN
IBSD

COURSE:
STRATEGIC CHANGE MANAGEMENT

ASSIGNMENT
BTEC PROFESSIONAL (LEVEL 7)

SUBMITTED TO
MR BISMARK TAMBI (LECTURER)

BY
MERCY KHEMBO

QUESTION ONE:
Examine how the content and process of change can affect its successful applicability. (Using a case study} QUESTION TWO:
Models of change and strategic interventions offer a good approach to managing change. Discuss with at least three models and six strategic interventions to support your answer. DATE OF SUBMISSION

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

CONTENTS

ABSTRACTS/SUMMARY

INTRODUCTION

METHODOLOGY

RESULTS OR FINDINGS

DISCUSSION

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

REFERENCES

APPENDICES

QUESTION 1
Change being the only constant as was put by Alvin Toffler the futurologist; it means that no matter what, change is going to be there. Therefore, it is necessary to put in place ways that will enhance a successful implementation of change in an organisation. Change is the process of moving from the current state to the desired state. Making a change involves, moving the organisation’s people and culture in line with the strategies, structure, processes and systems, (www.scribd.com). However, a careful approach has to be followed if one desires to achieve in implementing the change. One way of doing that is ensuring that the content and process of change will not provoke resistance, because depending on what approach you take, the content and process of change, can affect the successful applicability of change. CONTENT OF CHANGE

This is comprised of structure, systems and technology in the organisation. Structure includes; assessment of division of power. Systems comprise of rules and regulations, together with policies. And lastly, Technology is all the tools, techniques, Instruments and procedures. They have to be considered, because they are delicate issues that can easily hinder change to take effect. I. Structure

How the organisation is structured in terms of authority, also determines the response of the people to who change is being proposed. Without being careful, this may trigger a negative reaction; i. Pyramid- This is where power is centralised, as was well illustrated by following an example of how the Giza pyramids were built. Coercive power is mostly exercised, therefore, reducing the morale of commitment the people had, since they feel the change is being forced on them. ii. Flat- This follows the decentralised approach, whereby, everyone is free to give their input and is flexible to work without feeling they are under scrutiny. Compliance with the change is more likely, since they believe that it is a legitimate exercise. iii. Functional- The different departments of the organisation may have different perceptions as to how things are supposed to be done, depending on how communication between different departments is being influenced, there may be problems in fostering change. iv. Matrix- An individual may have two superiors to report to only for a particular project. This may have a negative impact where this person feels pressured as they may be required to report to two people. v. Divisional- For example, Strategic Business Units (SBU), as much as this division is aligned to the corporate goal of the organisation, they work more independently. Therefore, the people may fear loss of status power and resent being interfered when introduced to change and may end up reacting negatively. vi. Product- If an organisation is more product inclined, there is usually little motivation and commitment that affects the acceptance of change.

II. Systems
Rules, Regulation and Policies that an organisation put in place has a great influence on the perception of its employees, for these are a step by step guideline of what is supposed to be followed and they have a big influence on carving the culture of the organisation. Therefore, whatever rules, regulations and policies are being...
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