Open Source vs Close Source

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Open/Close Source
Open and Close source operation system seem to be the same the perform the same task in what a pears to be the same way. Other than this there is very little they have in common from the rights that they are distributed under to how they are and who they are developed by. Open source refers to the software-industry tradition of developing and sharing source code and standards, and of encouraging collaborative development. Often aligned with hacker culture, open-source software has contributed to many important developments in Internet infrastructure, including BIND, the Berkeley Internet Name Daemon servers that run the Domain Name System; in software, including Linux and the Apache Web server; and in software languages, including Perl, Tcl, and Python. Open source also epitomizes the philosophy of the “gift culture” within the Internet community, wherein people collaborate and exchange information freely in a climate of mutual respect. (Sage Publications, 2002) Open source is some time confused with freeware not all Open Source software is free. If Open Source software is distributed under a general public license (GPL) it can’t be redistributed as a binary-only product. This doesn’t prevent the development or selling of binary-only software, as long as anyone who receives binaries is also given the opportunity to purchase the source code for a reasonable distribution charge. Examples of Open source operation systems.

Unix was originally invented in 1969 at AT&T Bell Labs. When it was later implemented in the C programming language, it became the first operating system that could be easily adapted for use on any computer. There are several varieties of Unix, among them versions developed at the University of California at Berkeley from 1979 on, and AT&T's own later version, System V. The name Unix is now a trademark of the Open Group, which developed the Single Unix Specification. Linux development began in 1991 when a Finnish student,...
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