Week 5 Pos 355

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UNIX/Linux versus Mac versus Windows
POS/355

UNIX/Linux versus Mac versus Windows
Really, I’m not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a completely unintentional side effect. -Linus Torvalds

I wish him the best, I really do. I just think he and Microsoft are a bit narrow. He’d be a broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger. - Steve Jobs

Microsoft has had clear competitors in the past. It’s a good thing we have museums to document that. - Bill Gates (Torvalds, Gates, & Jobs, 2013)

Operating systems were not in existence before the 1960s. The definition of operating systems is a program designed to run other programs on the computer and is the most important program. In the past, computers were built to execute a series of single task similar to a calculator. In the 1960s came the MCP (Master Control Program) for the B5000 mainframe computer created by the company Burroughs/Unisys. The MCP was the first OS written exclusively in a high-level language. As the years progressed, OS giants were starting to form such as Windows, Linux, and Mac. In, this paper, these 3 tech OS giants will be examined thoroughly while covering memory management, process management, file management, and security. The UNIX and Linux Operating Systems (OS) are open source systems. The first version of UNIX was created in 1969 by computer scientist Kenneth Thompson at AT&T Bell Laboratories. The system was based on four parts: the shell, kernel, editor, and the assembler. Linux was created as a free software substitute to the commercial UNIX environments. The history of Linux dates back to 1983 and Linux runs a much greater range of platforms than most UNIX environments. Both OS share a common foundation because of the history and tradition. Memory management is an important part of an operating. The UNIX/Linux OS use numerous intricate algorithms for memory management which will permit the system to make effective use of valuable memory. The operating system memory is maintained in structures and these structures provide protection by converting the associated list into a tree. Process Management is a key function of an operating system. UNIX/Linux can support several types of hardware from different PC companies. UNIX/Linux utilizes a flexible design which includes a separate component to take of the process management task. The UNIX/Linux OS is somewhat similar to Mac on how the OS achieves these functions. All computers must have a method to manage files that it encompasses. There are different techniques for managing files and all are somewhat different. File management is a critical component of the Operating System and can be identified as the storing or the gathering of data for prospective use. UNIX/Linux is unique in its design where it can be case sensitive which is different from the Windows OS. UNIX/Linux and Mac also use a forward slash whereas Windows utilizes a backslash for path parting. UNIX/Linux employs symbolic & hard links to files. Directories do not recognize hard links so a symbolic link has to be created. A UNIX/Linux Operating System is does not suffer from fragmentation unlike the Windows Operating System and still utilizes the Hierarchical File System (HFS). An HFS is a system of trees to recognize the location of files. Security for a computer or Operating System can basically be defined as the security of data. UNIX/Linux, Mac, & Windows all have some sort of system in place to manage vulnerabilities. Security is important because it protects the system from numerous viruses. Linux/UNIX has a philosophy difference from other operating systems whereas security is built into the system architecture. Security threats are more prone to viruses in a Windows System in contrast to Mac OS & Linux/UNIX. Linux/UNIX will typically not try to open an infected extension and would generate an error. All Operating...
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