Interview

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Interview: How to bag the job!

Guidelines to Interviewing Skills.

In any interview situation, the interviewer is deftly attempting to find answers to three basic questions:

Can the person do the job?
Will the person do the job? And,
Will he or she get along with their staff?

Obviously there are numerous ways in which a prospective employer seeks answers to these three questions, plus others. Some interviewee tips that can help you provide the answers to them are:

1. Ask yourself how your uniqueness and skills can be applied toward the job you are seeking.

2. Be prepared to ask thought-provoking questions that will not only demonstrate your preparedness but also enable you to make an intelligent, informed decision as to whether you want to work for this organization.

3. Finally, always send thank-you letters.

With proper preparation, you can put your best foot forward when being interviewed for a job, while getting the feedback you need to make your own decision about that prospective employer.

The interviewer‘s aims

In any interview situation, the interviewer is deftly attempting to find answers to those three basic questions: In seeking the answer to the "can do" factor, the interviewer is trying to determine whether you are the job candidate who has the right skills, necessary education (or special certification if required) and experience to handle the job responsibilities. In other words, do your strengths match the job profile needs? As for the "will do" component, the interviewer seeks to determine what your motivation to do the job would be, and how you might overcome potential impediments. As for the "get along" component, nobody wants to hire an employee who will be a disruptive force in the workplace. All organizations want to determine as best they can how a prospective job applicant will get along and work with others. More often than not, after the interviewer has determined your "can do" abilities, the question of "Are we going to get along?" becomes his or her main focus.

Obviously there are numerous ways in which a prospective employer seeks answers to these three questions, plus others. The interviewee tips given below can help you provide the answers to them, while also helping your cause in other ways.

1. Know your uniqueness

Knowing what is unique about you is consistent with your résumé preparation. What competencies, education, experiences and skills do you have that are special? Each of us has our uniqueness, and that is what a prospective employer is endeavoring to find out about you. Ask yourself how your uniqueness and skills can be applied toward the job you are seeking. For example, if you have determined that one of your competencies is creativity, consider how you are creative, and be prepared to provide great illustrations in an interview. Be ready in the interview to build visual stories for the interviewer about how you achieved your successes in your past employment experiences, and tell how those skills will have a positive influence in your new job.

2. Match yourself to the job

It is not enough to assess your competencies - you need to match them to the job you are seeking. For instance, if you‘re applying for a management position, ask yourself what skills, such as business intelligence, are indispensable in that role. Ask yourself if you are proficient in the skills considered necessary to do a good solid job. As just noted, be prepared to cite illustrations for the interviewer of how you‘ve used your particular skills in the past, and how you will put to use that experience if you are hired. This is especially true when making the connection to the "can do" component.

If you see a potential misalignment or need for improvement, what action steps are you taking toward professional growth? No one is perfect. Employers realize that, and in many cases they simply...
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