Historical Places in Dhaka

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  • Topic: Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman
  • Pages : 22 (7663 words )
  • Download(s) : 1734
  • Published : August 9, 2011
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Introduction

It’s a presentation about the important historical places of ancient Dhaka. There are so many places which are really worthy of drawing our attention. But it is a mammoth task to sort out the important one among the many more. Here we tried to highlight most of the important historical places according to their glorious past and profound impact on the later life of the people living in this arena. Such as, the description of Lalbagh Fort reminds us our glorious past when people of Bengal used to lead a happy life as the subject of Shaista Khan. Ahsan Manjil which is still standing by the mighty river Buriganga, lets us know about Nawab Khwaja Ahsanullah who was a great philanthropist, especially who paved the way of establishing of The University of Dhaka by allotting such a massive area where Dhaka University is still functioning. Sonargaon of Issa Khan presents the happy picture of Bengal during his reign when people used to live in a perpetual bondage of happy life. Hoseni Dalan, Baitul Mukarram and Star Masjid and Dhakesswari temple etc. are the religious places for people. The Central Shahid Minar near Dhaka Medical College, The National Memorial at Savar, The Suhrawardi Udyan by Dhaka University and the Martyred Intellectual Memorial at Mirpur are really the golden witness of our Liberation war which occurred in 1971.

Ahsan Monjil

Ahsan Manzil, Bangladesh National Museum, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Shyamal Roy says: The palace has enjoyed a varied history, starting from being Rang Mahal (of Sheikh Enayetullah, a Zamindar of Jamalpur pargana (Barisal) during the time of the Mughals) to a French trading centre. Nawab Khwaja Alimullah bought it from the French in 1830 and converted it into his residence, effecting necessary reconstruction and renovations. The final reconstruction was done by Martin. Construction

The construction of the palace was begun in 1859 and completed in 1872. Abdul Ghani named it Ahsan Manzil after his son Nawab Khwaja Ahsanullah. The newly built palace first came to be known as the Rang Mahal. On April 7, 1888, a tornado caused severe damage to Ahsan Manzil -- Andar Mahal, the older part of the palace, was completely devastated. During the reconstruction of the Andar Mahal a good part of the palace was overhauled and repaired, and the exquisite dome of the present Rang Mahal was added. Ahsan Manzil was again damaged by an earthquake in 12 June 1897 and again repaired by the Nawab Ahsanullah.

Glory days

Nawab Sir Salimullah with his family in front of Ahsan Manzil In 1874, Lord Northbrook, Governor General of India attended an evening function in the palace when he came to lay the foundation of a water works installed by Nawab Abdul Ghani. In 1888, Lord Dufferin also accepted the hospitality offered at Ahsan Manzil. In 1904 Lord Curzon, on a visit to East Bengal, stayed in this palace on 18 and 19 February to win public support for the proposed Partition of Bengal. When in 1952 the Dhaka Nawab State was acquired under the East Bengal Estate Acquisition Act, it became impossible for the successors of the Nawabs to maintain the palace due to financial constraints. Nawab Khwaja Habibullah started living at Paribag Green House soon after the acquisition of the zamindari. The palace was soon on the verge of collapse as successors rented out rooms without considering its dignity. Over the years illegal occupants turned the place into a filthy slum. Recognizing the historical and architectural importance of the Ahsan Manzil, the government of Bangladesh took the initiative to renovate it. In 1985 Ahsan Manzil and its surroundings were acquired. After the completion of the renovation work in 1992 under the supervision of the Directorate of Public Works and Architecture, it was brought under the control of Bangladesh National Museum (20...
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