Cognitive Learning Theory Lecture

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Cognitive Learning Theory
What is Cognitive learning?
Cognitive Learning developed by theorist Edward C. Tolman, explains the way our brain processes and interprets information that we learn. The biological basis of cognitive learning style is grounded in brain theory. .("Different Cognitive Learning Styles," 2003-2013) It’s the relationship that occurs between two stimuli, but even though the stimulus is the same our brains react in different ways. However, each person process information at different rates. This type of learning style is basically defined as a personality aspect which affects attitudes, beliefs, and social communication. An example of Cognitive learning style can be how a person develops skills and familiarity, and how they establish and recall information. Some people need to picture the task before starting; others organize learning and teaching successively or casually and some work rapidly or purposefully. Cognitive Learning: Latent Learning

Cognitive learning is internal and is broken down into thought processes. One important cognitive process is called latent learning. Latent literally means ‘hidden”, and occurs without any reinforcement, but is only demonstrated when some type of incentive is given for doing it. Basically, you learn thru shear repetitiveness. Unknowingly, our brain absorbs the information which is stored deep in our subconscious, and is only brought out when faced with a situation when the information is necessary. For example, say you car pool with someone to work every day, but she/he drives. Although you’re not driving you may still learn the route to your job, but have no reason to demonstrate your knowledge of this. However, if the person you car pool with gets ill you may need to drive yourself. By doing so, subconsciously you realize you’ve learned the same route that the usual driver would take, this is considered latent learning. Cognitive Learning: Observational Learning

According to Albert Bandura...
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