Case Study for Abdominal Obstruction

Page 1 of 31

Case Study for Abdominal Obstruction

By | December 2012
Page 1 of 31
“NURSING CARE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENT
WITH ABDOMINAL OBSTRUCTION”

CHAPTER 1:INTRODUCTION
A) Background of the Study
B) Rationale for choosing the case
C) Significance of the study
D) Scope and Limitation
CHAPTER 2:HEALTH HISTORY
A) Biographic Data
B) Chief Complaint
C) History of Present Illness
D) Past Medical History
E) Family History
F) Physical Assessment
CHAPTER 3:DISCUSSION OF DISEASE PROCESS
A) Anaphysiology
B) Pathophysiology
C) Drug Study
D) Diagnostic and Laboratory Exam
CHAPTER 4:NURSING MANAGEMENT
A) Long Term Objective
B) Problem List
C) Nursing Care Plan
D) Course in the Ward
E) Discharged Planning

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION
BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
Intestinal obstruction exists when blockage prevents the normal flow of intestinal tract. The obstruction can be partial or complete. Its severity depends on the region of bowel affected, the degree to which the lumen is occluded, and especially the degree which the vascular supply to the bowel wall is disturbed. Most bowel obstructions occur in the small intestine. Adhesions are the most common cause of small bowel obstruction, followed by hernias and neoplasms. Intestinal contents, fluids and gas accumulate above the intestinal obstruction. The abdominal distention and retention of fluid reduce the absorption of fluids and stimulate more gastric secretion. With increasing distention, pressure within the intestinal lumen increases, causing a decrease in venous and arteriolar capillary pressure. This causes eventual rupture or perforation of the intestinal wall. Reflux vomiting may be caused by abdominal distention. Vomiting results in loss of hydrogen ions and potassium from the stomach, leading to reduction of chlorides and potassium in the blood and to metabolic alkalosis. Dehydration and acidosis develop from loss of water and sodium. With acute fluid losses, hypovolemic shock may occur. The initial symptom is...