Bullying and Effects of Bullying

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BULLYING – 333 – OUTCOME 5.1 / 5.2 /5.3

Bullying is intentional harmful behavior initiated by one or more students and directed toward another student. Bullying exists when a student with more social and/or physical power deliberately dominates and harasses another who has less power. Bullying is unjustified and typically repeated.

• Bullying differs from conflict. Two or more students can have a disagreement or a conflict. Bullying involves a power imbalance element where a bully targets a student who has difficulty defending him or herself.

• Bullies often feel justified in inflicting hurtful behavior because they think their victims deserve the mistreatment.

• Students who are repeatedly victimized experience more physical and psychological problems than non-bullied peers.

• Bullying occurs both with and without a teacher or another adult present.

• Bullies appear to be concerned with their own wants, pleasures, and needs.

• Bullies are more likely than non-bullies to be involved in vandalism, fighting, theft, substance abuse, truancy, or to have an arrest by young adulthood.

• Victims can withdraw and become depressed if bullying continues over time. Some victims could take extreme measures and seek violent revenge or consider suicide.

What are the Forms of Bullying?

Physical: Physical bullying involves harmful actions against another person’s body. Examples include: biting, kicking, pushing, pinching, hitting, tripping, pulling hair, any form of violence or intimidation. Physical bullying also involves the interference with another person’s property. Examples include: damaging or stealing.

Verbal: Verbal bullying involves speaking to a person or about a person in an unkind or hurtful way. Examples include: sarcasm, teasing, put-downs, name calling, phone calls, spreading rumors or hurtful gossip.

Emotional: Emotional bullying involves behaviors that upset, exclude, or embarrass a person. Examples include: nasty notes, saying mean things using technology (e.g. cyber bullying using emails, instant messaging), chat rooms, tormenting threatening, humiliation or social embarrassment.

Sexual: Sexual bullying singles out a person because of gender and demonstrates unwarranted or unwelcome sexual behavior. Examples include: sexual comments, abusive comments, unwanted physical contact.

Racial: Racial bullying involves rejection or isolation of a person because of ethnicity. Examples include: gestures, racial slurs or taunts, name calling, making fun of customs/skin color/accent/food choices.

Social alienation is when a bully excludes someone from a group on purpose. It also includes a bully spreading rumors, and also making fun of someone by pointing out their differences. 5. Intimidation is when a bully threatens someone else and frightens that person enough to make him or her do what the bully wants Cyberbullying is done by sending messages, pictures, or information using electronic media, computers (email & instant messages), or cell phones (text messaging & voicemail). For instance, if you sent a picture of a snake in an email to a person because you know that they are afraid of snakes, that would be an example of cyberbullying. According to a survey done in 2003 only 4% of bullying is listed as "other types" and this would include cyberbullying. Even though this number seems small, the growth of this type of bullying is going up fast because of the spread of technology around the world

Dealing with Bullies

The best way to deal with a bully is to stay away from him/her. A bully is looking for a reaction, so if your child is ever the target of a bully, encourage them to ignore him/her, or give the bully a look that says, “This is really stupid.” Then walk away.

If your child is having a problem with a bully, they need to have a voice in how the situation is handled. They should let their friends know what’s going on and ask for their...
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