Brand Knowledge

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 236
  • Published : June 14, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Brand Knowledge Structure and Brand Elements

What is Brand Awareness? Recognition versus recall

Brand versus situation cues

Awareness depth versus breath

Brand versus situation linkages

Why is brand awareness important?
A necessary condition for inclusion in the set of brands being considered for purchase – A sufficient condition for choice in low-involvement decision settings – Influences the nature and strength of association –

Brand Image Brand Perceptions through Associations
Types of brand association Attributes Product-related
(various degrees of Features/ingredients)





Price User imagery


Symbolic Usage imagery Feelings and feelings -associated experiences Brand personality

Strength of brand associations

Favorability of brand associations
Uniqueness of brand associations

Brand Image Brand Perceptions through Associations

Degree of Abstractness
Types of brand association Attributes Benefits Functional Attitudes


(various degrees of Features/ingredients)

Price User imagery


Experiential Usage imagery Feelings and feelings -associated experiences Brand personality

Strength of brand associations Favorability of brand associations

Uniqueness of brand association

Strength of Brand Association
Connection by Direct Experience
Connection by Communicated Noncommercial Messages Connection by Communicated Commercial Messages

Brand A

Connection by Inferences

Strength of Brand Association (Initial Associative Strength)

Brand A

Quantity: Attention Quality: Relevance and Consistency

Strength of Brand Association– Recallability (Long-Term Associative Strength) Presence of other product information Type and number of cues in the context of recall

Length of time

Favorability and Uniqueness of Brand Associations I want it (desirability) Brand X can deliver it

It is different

Determine Desired Brand Knowledge Identify Target Market

Demographic, Psychographic, Geographic, and Behavioral Segmentation

Identify the Brand Competitors Analyze the Similarities and Differences between the Brand and the Competitors –

Point of parity is often the first step before the establishment of the point of difference

In-Class Exercise 1
You are sitting in a room with two doors. When a knock sounds at each, the butler announces that “California” is at one entrance to the room, while “Nebraska” is at the other. Describe each brand in terms of – – – –

What it would look like What it would be wearing What it would say when you went to the door What would be its reason for visiting

In-Class Exercise 2
Computer and the telephone have had a dramatic impact on the greeting card industry. How had Hallmark Cards responded thus far and what should they do in the future to protect and maintain brand equity? What about Blockbuster Video?

Brand Identification and Elements

Brand Elements and Criteria
Brand Names Brand Logos Brand Symbols Brand Characters Brand Slogans Brand Jingles Brand Packages Memorability
– –

Easily recognized and recalled Descriptive, interesting, persuasive, visual/verbal Within/across product categories and across cultures/geographical areas Flexible and updatable Legally and competitively protectable

Meaningfulness Transferability

– –


ID That Brand
Compare the components of two brands in the same product category

ID That Cereal
Develop brand objectives/Study the product Generate names/concepts Screen/evaluate list of names (management, marketing, legal, etc.) Consumer research Final name selection

Discussion Points
What are the pros and cons of narrow vs. broad slogans? (E.g., Mita’s “All we make are copiers & Xerox’s “The document company) How is the choice of branding elements influenced by a firm’s segmentation,...
tracking img