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Paleolithic vs. Neolithic

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Paleolithic vs. Neolithic
It has long been understood that in order for a species to survive there needs to be a certain level of adaptation. It is an integral and well-known concept of the human race and a familiar and widely accepted component in the development of man. Essentially, this is what happened when the Paleolithic cultures evolved into the Mesolithic, and eventually the Neolithic culture. The concepts of specialization and diversification were relevant in the transformation of these cultures.
Specialization can be defined as “a structural adaptation of a body part to a particular function or of an organism for life in a particular environment” (Merriam-Webster). The hunter-gatherers of the Paleolithic culture were prepared, sometimes at a moment’s notice, to pick up and evacuate their current living areas in order to migrate to an environment in which their living conditions would be greatly improved. Such conditions included better climates, and most importantly, more suitable land to live off of. The scarcity of food was a major problem at the time. The hunter-gatherers of the Paleolithic society were tasked with solving this prevalent issue and they did so with the strategic use of tools and stone. Such tools include the common hand axe, chisel, the arrow and spearhead, and the grinder (“Early Humans”). Tools such as these enabled them to acquire larger quantities of food and necessities for a longer, and ultimately, a more healthful life.
The decision process of the nomadic people with regards to the settlement location and migration patterns were largely a factor based upon the current conditions of the weather. There were not many women or children whom survived, the population mainly consisted of aggressive men who were a part of smaller groups, made up predominately of adults usually numbering around thirty. This in turn made it easier to provide food and shelter since there were a fewer number of people. During the Paleolithic era, people’s main occupation was

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