Organs For Sale Summary

Better Essays
Response to “Organs for Sale”
“Organs for Sale” is an argument written in response to the on-going ethical debate of a market-based incentive program to meet the rising demands of organ transplants. With many on the waiting list for new organs and few organs being offered, the author, Sally Satel, urges for legalization of payment to organ donors. Once in need of a new kidney herself, Sally writes of the anguish she encountered while facing three days a week on dialysis and the long wait on the UNOS list with no prospective willing donors in sight. She goes on to list several saddening researched facts on dialysis patients survival rates, length of time on the UNOS wait list, and registered as well as deceased donor numbers. While Sally is
…show more content…
In this option, she suggests that the donor could choose how he or she wanted to be compensated. With compensation ranging from deposits to a retirement fund to lifetime health insurance benefits, you really can’t go wrong with this route. She does go on to note that some would be unimpressed and even upset with the fact that undereducated or irresponsible spenders would simply choose to donate for the quick payment and then spend frivolously. Honestly, I don’t see how any one would think they have the right to mandate the way someone spends their money, or legally obtains it at that. If a person chooses to be a plumber and then spend all of their paycheck on beer, they have every right to. And this should be the case with a volunteer compensated donor.
Next, Mrs. Satel mentions the “multiple compensator” option. She does not elaborate much on this possibility, but she does mention a sort of arranged triangle between the donor, compensator, and hospital. She explains that charities or insurance companies could be the compensators. With the lack of detail on this option, and my lack of understanding, I’m afraid I can neither agree nor disagree with this

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The trade of organs has been a controversial issue for a long time all over the world. The article “Why Selling Kidneys Should Be Legal” is published by The New York Times in December, 2011. The article is written in an effective manner to attract the audience and argue for the legalization of selling kidneys and compensation for donors. By using personal experience to grab the audience’s attention, with the aid of false analogies as well as rhetorical techniques, the article is relatively effective in sharing information of kidney trade and persuading the audience to legalize the selling of kidney.…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Compensating donors for organ donations is one of the most controversial debates we have today. The shortage of organ donations in America is the one of the main reason there is a sudden drive to supplement the possible sources of organs. It first began with the move from donations of organs from cadaver to donations from living donors, and no the debate is rerisen, to the possibility of building a market for organ donations with a financial incentive.…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In Alexander T. Tabarrok’s essay, “A Moral Solution to the Organ Shortage” Alexander explains ways to find solutions to the organ shortage by proposing a fair way to go about qualifying for organ transplant. Gary Becker suggested that paying a good amount of money toward funeral cost of organ donors would help and encourage people to donate their organs. The new rule that Alexander wanted to proposed is the “no -give - no - take” rule. Under this rule in order to receive an organ a person must have previously signed their organ donor card. Under “no - give - no take”, signing your organ donor card is like joining the club, the club of people who have agreed to share their organs. People have different views when it comes to donating organs. Some have their doubts about becoming an organ donor because of their religious beliefs, while others thinks that by signing an organ donor card it’s same as buying an insurance . NOTE In some ways I agree with Alexander on this new rule that he has proposed ( UNOS). Having a donor card is a good idea to make sure there is surplus of organs able to be donated. I’m not convinced that the “no- give no - take” rule will be productive to solve the shortage of our organ donors any time soon, since Alexander’s essay was based on suggestion. As for myself I would have doubt of donating my organs not because of my religion or beliefs, but the trust of the people that handling my organs. This essay has inspired me to rethink being an organ donor because of the problems of most organizations. In my own views, paying tremendous amounts of money to organ donors to saved someones life is a wrong way to help people that in need. As time progresses and suggestions becomes reality I would be more confident in donating my organs. NOTE…

    • 317 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Organs are constantly needed around the world by dying patients and anxious doctors. Sadly, there isn’t enough donors so patients stuck in the waiting list are being left untreated because of the lack of organs. I believe donating should be forced to be mandatory everywhere because people don’t believe they need to. In reality it is our moral duty to help whoever is in need. I plan to present the benefits, problems, and solutions towards this controversial topic.…

    • 806 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sally Satel

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    As a previous member of the waiting list, Satel resorted to desperate measures when she considered going to the black market to obtain a kidney that she needed as well as trying a website called matchingdonors.com. She was lucky enough to find a match on the website, but unfortunately he fell through. As far as the black market goes, she thought it was too risky and unsafe even though she was in a life or death situation. This all could have been prevented if more people in our country were to consider themselves organ donors. If the black market isn’t safe for buying movies or getting music illegally, then it is definitely not safe for buying a kidney. This small statement in Satel’s essay provides a shocking emotional appeal to the readers.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Liver Transplant Ethics

    • 1089 Words
    • 4 Pages

    willing to give, that they have an obligation to save their life". Gift of Life Donor Program…

    • 1089 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Commercialization of organ transplant can lead to health risks to the donor. People who are not fit to donate may offer to donate their organ for the monetary gains. This can result even in the death of the donor. Commercialization of organs may lead to loss of integrity and ethics in the society. People who are mentally unstable may be coerced to donate their organs. The rate of crime will also rise in the society. People will start killing each other so as to obtain the organs (Kanniyakonil, 2005). Commercialization of organs may lead to extortion of patients. This is in the case where an increase in the demand of a given…

    • 943 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In modern medicine societies, organ transplantation is an opportunity to save peoples’ lives. The downside of organ transplantation is that the demand for organs outweighs the supply. This becomes morally challenging in the context for those who participate in a market as a solution due to the lack of available organs. A market is the selling of organs, which is an unlawful practice in many parts of the world. It is a transaction between those who are seeking for organs to arrange with brokers, and procure organs from those who exist in impoverished, underdeveloped countries. An effort to increase the organ pool is to offer a financial inducement for the organ vendors. The ethical issue of this strategy is that donors no longer participate for altruistic reasons but decide to become vendors, for financial purposes, which means to partake in a commodity for material gain.…

    • 1544 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Satel begins her contemporary argument ‘organs for sale” by talking about her past experience when in need of a kidney, she talked about how frustrating it could be waiting for a kidney while decisions by potential donors are changed. The argument appeared in the journal of the American Enterprise Institution on October 14, 2006. She appeals to the…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    organs will save lives

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the essay “Organ Sales Will Save Lives” by Joanna MacKay, kidney failure is the main topic. In her thesis, MacKay states that, “Governments should not ban the sale of human organs; they should regulate it (92).” The thesis is supported by one main reason: it will save lives. In America 350,000 people struggle each year from this situation. MacKay also states that with the legal selling of organs, more people will be willing to give up their kidneys. There are also other ways to save lives like dialysis, but this situation would only be for a temporary time period, transplant is definitely the way to go. People in third world countries are extremely willing to sell their kidneys because they need the money (94). MacKay points out that there is a black market for selling kidneys for $150,000 because it is illegal to sell organs in many countries (93). The broker who arranges the sale, takes advantage of uneducated poor people who are in desperate need of money, only paying them around $1,000 for a kidney (93). People around the world also donate kidneys from the good of their heart; these people have very good moral reasoning’s. She then goes on to talk about the pros and cons of this transplant and how everybody gains except the patient. The workers in the hospitals are paid to do the operation, the person who needs the kidney walks away with one, and the donor is left with nothing. The Government could also regulate this transaction to help make the donors receive money, this way there would be more kidneys up for grab. In her essay Mackay uses statistics and accurate evidence to get through to the readers how she feels about the cause and effect of this operation in modern day.…

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In MacKay’s essay, “Organ Sales Will Save Lives,” she states that legalizing the sale of human organs will save millions of lives. Instead of prohibiting the sale of human organs, she believes the government should make it legal and manage the process. Kidney transplantation or dialysis is the only treatments available for people suffering from renal failure (MacKay 157). Dialysis is temporary and it has horrific side effects. Whereas, a kidney transplant offers a permanent solution. According to MacKay, there are not many people willing to donate their kidney without some form of compensation (157). Therefore, patients are desperately turning to the black market to purchase a kidney from a living donor. Although…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    References: Alexander, J.W., & Zola J. C. (1996). Expanding the donor pool: use of marginal donors for…

    • 2472 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    More than 100,000 men, women and children in need of life-saving organ transplants, every 10 minutes another person is added to the national organ transplant waiting list and averages of 18 people die each day from the lack of available organs. (donatelife.net) Organ transplants are very important because they replace the damaged organ and help the body function once again. There are still huge shortages of organs, even after awareness and other ways of educating the public. Some Americans are open to donating but many more are against it or unaware of the process which leaves many without organs and dying every day. The ongoing debate is whether to give financial incentives to organ donors to promote organ donation which would put a price on human parts but also save thousands more lives. The Government should give financial incentives to promote organ donation so as to save thousands of lives, to erode the black market and to better improve the flawed system we have today for organ transplant.…

    • 1590 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Every single year 4,000 people die waiting to receive a kidney alone. Thousands more die waiting on the organ donor list. It is the desperate need to survive that has caused people to do immeasurable things, even if it’s illegal. The organ sales on the black market is a very real thing. Obviously, there is a great need for organs, so is the global market for organ sales the answer? This is a complicated and delicate question to pose because many believe that a for profit system cannot exist without exploiting the poor and underprivileged. However, is the need for the market so great that society should be willing to take that risk? Is the fear of death so great, that you would go to jail in order to keep living? This paper will portray different…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Currently, there are over 100,000 people on the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) waiting list for organ transplantation (2012, Transplant Trends). Only 26, 246 transplantations occurred between January and November of 2011, (UNOS, 2012, Transplant Trends). There is a huge contrast in the number of people needing organs and the number of organs actually available for transplantation. This lack of organs creates a serious dilemma regarding how to increase the supply of organs for transplantation. So far, many of the efforts to increase organ donation have focused on the procurement from deceased donors; unfortunately, those efforts have failed to yield any significant increase to organ donation. Perhaps, it is now time to focus on increasing donation from live donors. Rather than the current method for organ procurement from live donors, which relies on altruism, there needs to be a shift toward providing incentives or compensation to live donors in the form of payment.…

    • 1983 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays