The Pros And Cons Of Organ Donation

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Compensating donors for organ donations is one of the most controversial debates we have today. The shortage of organ donations in America is the one of the main reason there is a sudden drive to supplement the possible sources of organs. It first began with the move from donations of organs from cadaver to donations from living donors, and no the debate is rerisen, to the possibility of building a market for organ donations with a financial incentive.

There are many ethical principles that support organ donation. Today, organ donation follows the true definition of altruism. Altruism is when we act to promote someone else’s welfare or benefit, even at a risk or cost to ourselves. Donation is considered an altruistic act because it is an unselfish thing that is given despite the fact there is not type of gain for them, financial,etc, Donation also benefited by the principle of beneficence which is the state of doing or producing good (Veatch, Haddad, & English, 2010, p. 429). The principal of justice could be described as the moral obligation to act on the basis of fair adjudication between competing claims. By offering a financial incentive, I feel that this principle would be hard to maintain. The virtue of charity gives adequate
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As in any business transaction, I feel that anytime money is introduced revolving around a decision, that decision can be skewed and these decisions are made based on the wrong reasons. In the end I understand that each day we have an average of 22 people that die while waiting for appropriate organ to become available and that either cannot that can't take place or they wait for an extended amount of time because of the shortage of donated organs. I just feel that paying someone for their donation, doesn’t really make it a donation, it is basically someone paying for an item they

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