"Interventions Of Person Centered Therapy" Essays and Research Papers

  • Interventions Of Person Centered Therapy

    on Person centered therapy. Write in 3 equal parts the following: Briefly describe the key concepts. Explain the strengths and weaknesses of this therapy. How do you feel about the approach of this therapy? Answer: Psychotherapy Networker conducted a survey in 2006 (as cited in Corey, 2009) identifying Carl Rogers as the single most influential psychotherapist of the past quarter century. Using humanistic psychological concepts, Rogers formulated a person-centered approach to therapy. According...

    Empathy, Family therapy, Feeling 1700  Words | 6  Pages

  • Person Centered Therapy

    behaviourism and psychoanalysis therapies, person-centered therapy has revolutionised the direction of counselling theory and practice. As the name implies, person-centered approach views clients as the ultimate agents for self-change. It assumes that humans are essentially positively motivated and can be trusted to make their own decisions to shape, direct and take responsibility for the way they live their lives. Since its conceptualization by Carl Rogers, person-centered therapy has yield successful treatment...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy 2055  Words | 9  Pages

  • Person-Centered Therapy

    Person-Centered Therapy Person-Centered Therapy is a form of psychoanalytical counseling developed in the 1940s by Carl Rogers. The foundation of this form of therapy stemmed from Rogers’ belief that all people have an inherent desire to be good. Every person has a self-concept or an ideal self which represents what type of person they want to be or think they are. However, a person’s self-concept may not be reflected in their real life experiences and this incongruence creates psychological...

    American Psychological Association, Clinical psychology, Feeling 804  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person-Centered Therapy

    Person-centered therapy (PCT), which is also known as client-centered, non-directive, or Rogerian therapy, is an approach to counseling and psychotherapy that places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a non directive role. Two primary goals of PCT are increased self-esteem and greater openness to experience. Some of the related changes that this form of therapy seeks to foster in clients include closer agreement between the client’s idealized...

    Empathy, Gestalt therapy, Human 1444  Words | 4  Pages

  • Person Centered Therapy

    Evaluate the claim that Person-centered Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients. Introduction Person-centered therapy is just one of over more than 300 different types of psychotherapy treatments available to clients, illustrated by Holmes and Lindley (1989) as ranging from Active Analytical Psychotherapy to Zaraleya Psychoenergetic Technique. Over the years, these varying schools of thought have not always seen eye to eye with emphasis being placed on differences...

    Abraham Maslow, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, Personality psychology 2327  Words | 7  Pages

  • Person Centered

     Person Centered Therapy: A Humanistic Approach to Care Person Centered Therapy: A Humanistic Approach to Care A humanistic approach to care can also be viewed as an existentialist view. According to Corey (2009), as humans we are capable of self-awareness, which is the distinctive capacity that allows us to reflect and to decide. In person centered/humanistic therapy the nurse utilizes communication that ensures each individual experiences the presence...

    Human, Morality, Nurse 1178  Words | 4  Pages

  • Carl Rogers Person Centered Therapy

    CARL ROGERS AND PERSON CENTERED THERAPY Carl Rogers Carl Ransome Rogers, the most influential American psychologist of the 20th century was born on the 8th January 1902, in Oak Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He was the fourth child out of the six children. His father Walter A. Rogers was a civil engineer and his mother Julia M. Cushing was a housewife and a ...

    Emotion, Empathy, Experience 1544  Words | 6  Pages

  • Person Centered Case Conceptualization

    Person-Centered Case Study of Melissa A Conceptualization and Treatment Plan Liberty University Abstract Person-centered therapy was developed over the course of approximately 40 years by a man named Carl Rogers. Rogers believed a person experienced dysfunction when they are unable to experience themselves as the individual they perceive themselves to be. This is a person-centered case study for Melissa Reed who views her ideal self as a mother and wife. A woman who is now on her fifth marriage...

    Perception, Psychotherapy, Therapeutic relationship 2384  Words | 7  Pages

  • A Brief Comparison of Psychoanalytic and Person-Centered Therapy

    Within the field of counseling and therapy there are endless theoretical stances, each of which develop different perspectives on humanity and establish varying counselor roles. Consideration of the implications of these various orientations is essential in the process of choosing the appropriate therapy for an individual. As an illustration, examine the stark contrast between psychoanalytic therapy and person-centered therapy. The core of any theoretical approach in psychology lies in the unique...

    Gestalt therapy, Humanistic psychology, Jacques Lacan 1003  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person-Centered Therapy: Personal Model of Helping

    Personal Model of Helping Unconditional Empathetic Empowerment Therapy (UEET) is closely related to Person Centered Therapy to a certain degree. This particular model or approach of therapy is designed to meet the clients where they are, see the issues through their lenses, coach them on goal setting, help client become self-aware so that they can find their own way towards a more fulfilling life style. To be able to help develop and build on a client’s strength is an empowering method and tool...

    Active listening, Empowerment, Life 1193  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person Centered

    Person-Centred Therapy Person-centred therapy (also referred to as Rogerian Psychology) is the psychological method founded by the humanistic psychologist Carl Rogers. It is centred on the idea that the individual has enormous potential for understanding themselves and therefore is best placed in the resolving of their own issues without any direct interjections from the therapist. Hence the therapy revolves around the individual as the promoter and architect of their own self change...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Emotion 1056  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person Centered Theory

    provide results for the clients. The person centered theory is designed to focus on humanism, human potential, conditions of worth, orgasmic valuing, the fully functioning person, and phenomenological perspective (Seligman & Reichenberg, 2010). There are three core values in the person centered theory, these are extremely important in the output of clinician-client relationships and facilitating change for positive results in the client. Looking at the therapy universally, these core values can...

    Existential therapy, Existentialism, Game theory 1122  Words | 4  Pages

  • Client Centered Therapy

    theories that followed him. I want to explore Client/Person Centered Therapy. This is a type of therapy that was pioneered by Carl Rogers. This therapy is different because as the name suggests it solely focuses on the client. 'In focusing on the client, the client’s feelings are deeply explored. The assumption is however, that the client was never able to have their feelings heard by the people surrounding them. Person Centered Therapy would allow the client to then be able to express their feelings...

    Emotion, Mental health, Psychology 1413  Words | 4  Pages

  • Person Centered Therpay

    Person Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy Person Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy Acquired Skills I have learned that my role as a therapist is not to bring in a client, but to enroll and engage the client in a therapeutic relationship. Thus, creating room for the client’s current state and allow room to change. The emphasis of fairness and impartial treatment as the therapist gives the client the ability to recognize and understand their problems...

    Emotion, Human, Learning 1127  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person Centered Theory

    Person Centered Theory A theory basing on concepts from humanistic psychology, also known as the “third force” in Psychotherapy by Carl Rogers, Person Centered Theory started its journey in the Psychotherapy field in the early 1940s, in which, according to Corey (2009, p.165), “stands out as one of the most influential figures in revolutionizing the direction of counseling theory and practice”, as that was a period of time when Psychotherapy was practiced in an approach whereby the therapists...

    Emotion, Human nature, Personal life 1533  Words | 4  Pages

  • Family Therapeutic Intervention, Narrative Therapy.

    of valuing emotional experiences and reflections. Our understanding of the preceding conversation is that in the state of being oppressed by violence, a person is defined by the violence. The concept of choice in that state is a mirage; a woman would not choose violence, but inside of a war zone there is no violence free territory. If the person and the context of violence are separated (deconstructed through externalization) the person's preferred story of their lives outside the "war zone" context...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy 1508  Words | 5  Pages

  • Person Centered Group Development

    Person Centered Group Development Group therapy or psychotherapy in the United States, has a long history that dates back into the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. During this time the America was being bombarded by masses of immigrants. Most of these immigrants settled in large cities. Organizations such as Hull House in Chicago were founded to assist them in adjusting to life in the United States. Known as settlement houses, these agencies helped immigrant groups lobby for better...

    Carl Rogers, Clinical psychology, Group dynamics 2105  Words | 6  Pages

  • Critical Analysis of Three Psychotherapy Approaches: Client-Centered Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Psychodynamic Therapy

    Critical Analysis of Three Psychotherapy Approaches: Client-Centered Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Psychodynamic Therapy Midterm SWG 598 Bridge I Introduction As social workers, it is our responsibility to use the most effective method of practice to engage our clients, assess their situation, and help them create goals that will produce positive outcomes. Every client will present a unique set of challenges; therefore, the social worker must be careful in choosing an approach that...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy 1812  Words | 6  Pages

  • Person Centered and Behavior Therapy A

    Person-Centered and Behavior Therapy: A Comparison Claudia Y Guerra Theories of Psychotherapy EDFR 6300 October 7, 2014 Instructor: Dr. Olivia Rivas Abstract This paper aims at describing the development of both person-centered and behavior therapy by illustrating a brief review of its history. Additionally, this paper aims at illustrating what constitute both person-centered and behavioral therapy. This author will explain the specific theories on personality for both person-centered...

    Behaviorism, Behaviour therapy, Classical conditioning 2912  Words | 12  Pages

  • Reaction to Person Centered Therapy

    Reaction Paper 2: Person-Centered Therapy Counseling Theories Reaction Paper 2: Person- Centered Therapy Reaction Paper: The theory I have chosen to write about is, person-centered therapy by Carl Rogers. The two concepts that will be discussed are: Three core attributes and to help client loosen rigid perceptions and make better decisions. Adolescents will be the population I’ll be focusing on. The reason I have choose adolescents to work with for the two concepts three core...

    Carl Rogers, Cengage Learning, Gale 528  Words | 2  Pages

  • Person Centered Therapy

    PCT Essay 1 Running head: AN ILLUSTRATION OF PERSON-CENTERED THERAPY What do you consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of the person-centered approach? What concepts and methods might build effective bonds with clients? Discuss any shortcomings in staying with this orientation. Word Count: 2214 * * i ¦* / PCT Essay 2 Abstract This essay would attempt to explain the fundamental concepts and therapeutic methodologies that might build effective bonds with clients...

    Abraham Maslow, Empathy, Gestalt therapy 1775  Words | 8  Pages

  • Person-Centred Therapy

     Person- Centred Therapy The Person-Centred Approach developed from the work of the psychologist Dr. Carl Rogers. In 1940s to 1960s, Carl Rogers approach to therapy was considered revolutionary. His specialist knowledge didn’t come from a theory but rather from his clinical therapy. Consequently, theory came out of practice. Person-Centred Therapy was originally seen as non-directive. The reasoning for that was because Rogers didn’t...

    American Psychological Association, Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology 932  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person Centered Therapy

    Carl Rogers and Person Centered Counseling Cheri Burns Theories of Personality, Psy 330 Brandy Goldston August 17, 2009 Introduction Carl Rogers, (1902-1987), was an American psychologist who developed person-centered therapy. This type of humanistic counseling deals with the ways in which people perceive themselves consciously rather than having a counselor try to interpret unconscious thoughts or ideas. There are many different components and tools used in person-centered counseling, including...

    Big Five personality traits, Carl Rogers, Conceptions of self 5415  Words | 16  Pages

  • The Similarities and Differences Between Client-Centered Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy

    The similarities and differences between client-centered and psychodynamic therapies are: Client-centered therapy: An approach to counseling where the client determines the general direction of therapy, while the therapist seeks to increase the client's insightful self-understanding through informal simplified questions. The client is the focal point of the sessions, the therapist takes a "back seat" to learn about the person, and watch as the client moves toward the achievement of their full...

    Cengage Learning, Gale, Psychoanalysis 755  Words | 3  Pages

  • ‘’Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centered Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients’’

    words Course code: ‘’Evaluate the claim that Person-centered therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients’’ This essay is intended to explore the statement that Person-centered therapy offers therapists all they need to treat clients. In order to do this I intend to further explore the opinions of other individuals practicing and researching counseling therapies. My first thoughts are that if the Person centered approach was sufficient, there might not have been...

    Abraham Maslow, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Maslow's hierarchy of needs 2436  Words | 7  Pages

  • Person-Centered Care

    Person-Centered Care Cindy Carney HCA 333 Dr. Vivian Greenway July 29, 2013 Long-term care is not really something someone thinks about until they are faced with the challenge of finding a quality long-term care facility to care for their aging or ill family member. Most of us have probably known someone who is in a long-tern facility, and most of us would never want to be placed in one due to the impression that we have about them as being dreary, dirty, smelly, and where you go to die....

    Activities of daily living, Care of residents, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 1155  Words | 4  Pages

  • Therapies

    Individual Therapy One to One Relationship – take place over a designated period of time in a stable meeting Phases (Nurse-client relationship) Preinteraction phase – obtaining information about a client from chart or others, nurse examines feelings/anxieties about the client Orientation/Introductory phase – trust/rapport, establish contract for intervention (goal), gather data, assess strengths & weaknesses, establish nursing dx, set goals, develop action plan, explore feelings of nurse & client...

    Clinical psychology, Family therapy, Goal 565  Words | 3  Pages

  • Planning a Person-Centered Practice

     1.1 Person centered practice is providing care and needs which centers on the client. Its a way of caring for person as an individual and putting them and their families at the heart of all decisions. They are recognized as individuals with their own personality, likes and dislikes who has individual beliefs and preferences. Person centered practice put value to the independence, privacy, partnership, choice, dignity, respect and rights of the client 1.2 There are several different approaches or...

    Decision making, Decision making software, Decision theory 1666  Words | 5  Pages

  • Person centred therapy

     5th November 2013 Essay 1: ‘Evaluate the claim that Person–Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients’. In this essay I will look at the benefits and the disadvantages of person-centred therapy and consider whether it provides sufficient tools for the therapist to be effective in the treatment of the client. Looking at the underlying theory (self-actualisation, organismic...

    Abraham Maslow, Feeling, Maslow's hierarchy of needs 2630  Words | 7  Pages

  • Person Centered Care

    to the art and science section contact: Gwen Clarke, art and science editor, Nursing Standard, The Heights, 59-65 Lowlands Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill, Middlesex HA1 3AW. email: gwen.clarke@rcnpublishing.co.uk Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D Manley K et al (2011) Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D. Nursing Standard. 25, 31, 35-37. Date of acceptance: February 7 2011. Summary This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing...

    Health, Health care, Health care provider 2191  Words | 7  Pages

  • Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centred Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients

    “Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients” The humanistic movement was established as a way to expand and improve upon the two other schools of thought; behaviourism and psychoanalysis, which had, up until the first half of the 20th century dominated psychology. An American theorist called Abraham Maslow began to research creativity in humans through art and science. He first introduced his concept of a hierarchy of needs in...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Clinical psychology 2513  Words | 7  Pages

  • History of Marriage and Family Therapy

    History of MFT The history of family therapy began around 1960 when Gregory Bateson came up with the term, “system thinking.” This type of therapy was a daring departure, from traditional and individual treatment during the 1960s. He was involved in the schizophrenia research project in Palo Alto, California, which had a strong impact in shaping the course of family therapy. Along with his colleagues Jay Haley, John Weakland, William Fry, Don Jackson and later Virginia Satir, Paul Watzlawick,...

    Clinical psychology, Family, Family therapy 919  Words | 3  Pages

  • Therapeutic interventions

    Definition Therapeutic interventions encompass not just the nursing profession but each nurse as an individual. Whether realized or not, every intervention a nurse implements is therapeutic. Sometimes these interventions can have a good or bad effect. Through research and continuing knowledge, a nurse can learn or improve these interventions so that the highest quality of care is given to each and every patient. Therapeutic interventions can be defined as actions or behaviors involving clients...

    A Great Way to Care, Faith healing, Healing 1213  Words | 4  Pages

  • Existential Therapy

    Theory Outline Project Assignment Raymond McCall March 28, 2013 Grand Canyon University PCN-500 Instructor: Gigi Sofia Theory Outline I. Theory: Person Centered Therapy a. Key Concepts i. A client can find away to resolve their issues when they make themselves aware. Some client result to faith to gain a sense of self direction. The client must figure out what he or she want to be verses what he or she is. During that time the client focus is on the present...

    Existential therapy, Fritz Perls, Gestalt therapy 1625  Words | 7  Pages

  • Me in Person Centered Counseling

    My Journey towards good life & the fully functioning person As mentioned in the hand out “That good life is not a fixed state”, it is a PROCESS, it is a ‘direction not a destination’. A good life according to me and my experiences comes under the process: 1. An Increasing Openness to Experience. 2. Increasingly Existential living. The two above processes fit right with my life. Just to give a brief back ground here I must state how I was before the two characteristics. My father played...

    2007 albums, Abraham Maslow, Accept 1216  Words | 3  Pages

  • Person Centered Counselling

    many theories, sometimes very different from each other. There are, however, three major theoretical approaches: “humanistic”, “psychodynamic” and “cognitive behavioural” and within each of these approaches there are discrete models, for example, “person centred” and “transpersonal”. This diversity of counselling theories and approaches is really valuable and important. Why? Because the different theories relate to different ways of thinking about how people develop and manage their lives and reflects...

    Locus of control, Motivation, Need 1009  Words | 3  Pages

  • Compare And Contrast The Psychodynamic Cognitive Behavioral And Person Centered Approaches To Counseling

    approaches of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and person centered approaches to counseling fascinating. There are many different aspects to all three approaches that fit my personality. I do not believe that I would be able to pick one single approach and stick to it. I do however feel that if you have a client that would benefit from one single approach then that would be the responsible thing to do for the client. However, I am not sure if a persons (professional) human nature or personality would...

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, Consciousness, Mind 1425  Words | 4  Pages

  • Therapies

    THERAPIES AND TREATMENTS Due to the harmful effects created by the traumatic experience of being bullied some victims have a hard time recovering from the said situation. They are greatly affected not only socially but mentally, emotionally and personally as well. Some even have the psychotic tendency of retreating to their personal haven because of the fear that they will again be experiencing the traumatic experience. Mostly these victims are so affected that their self-esteem suffers great damage...

    Human behavior, Irrationality, Motivation 1466  Words | 5  Pages

  • P c t therapy

    Person-centered therapy (PCT) is also known as person-centered psychotherapy, person-centered counseling, client-centered therapy and Rogerian psychotherapy. PCT is a form of talk-psychotherapy developed by psychologist Carl Rogers in the 1940s and 1950s. The goal of PCT is to provide clients with an opportunity to develop a sense of self wherein they can realize how their attitudes, feelings and behavior are being negatively affected.[1] Although this technique has been criticized by behaviorists...

    Carl Rogers, Cognition, Phenomenology 651  Words | 3  Pages

  • Brief Strategic Family Therapy

    his article describes a systematic program of research that focuses on Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) and the adaptations that were developed based on BSFT principles. The culture-specific origins of BSFT are reviewed, as well as its broader applications to the field of family therapy. Research is reviewed demonstrating that BSFT is a promising family-based approach to treating Hispanic youth behavior problems and drug abuse. Treatment innovations are described that address the combination...

    Cybernetics, Dysfunctional family, Family 1340  Words | 4  Pages

  • Rogers: Father of Humanistic Movement Person-Centered Therapy

    Carl Rogers is the father of the humanistic movement in psychotherapy His core theme in therapy is non-judgmental listening & acceptance of the client, better known as unconditional positive regard His therapeutic approach is known as the Person Centered Therapy, which is based on the concepts of humanistic psychology & shares many of the concepts of Existentialism Both of these concepts share the idea that the client can make positive & constructive choices His approach is also based on the theory...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology 1981  Words | 10  Pages

  • Carl Roger, Person-Centered Therapy (P.C.T)

    Carl Roger, Person-Centered Therapy (P.C.T) Introduction to the Theories of Counseling (GSC 584) Essay 1 ESSAY 1 The theory that I chose to use is Client Centered Therapy. The C.C.T. Was developed by Carl Rogers in the 40's and 50's. Carl Rogers was born January 8, 1902 in Oak Park, Illinois. His therapy is a non-directive therapy also known as Rogerian therapy or client centered therapy. Like Psychotherapy that places responsibility...

    Carl Rogers, Gestalt therapy, Humanistic psychology 430  Words | 2  Pages

  • Person Center Therapy

    WINFREY’S PERSON CENTERED THERAPY Winfrey’s Person Centered Therapy: Review Journals Approach to Psychotherapy and Counseling Talia Washington-Winfrey Rochester College WINFREY’S PERSON CENTERED THERAPY Abstract Winfrey’s Person Centered Therapy (PCT) is a form of talk psychotherapy. This therapy is to provide clients to develop a sense of feelings, to bring out emotions, and a reflection of behavior also known as Client-Centered. Throughout this form of therapy the therapist...

    Alfred Adler, Clinical psychology, Existential therapy 2876  Words | 9  Pages

  • Relationships of a Christ-Centered Person

    Relationships of a Christ Centred Person Intro: We’ve been studying the various aspects of a Christ centred person. We looked at his finances, his work, his spirituality, the way he handles sensuality and the way a woman ought to be. Today we want to take a look at his relationships. Now although we are half way through the series it’s important to understand what we mean when we say Christ centred. We don’t just mean that you say you believe in Jesus claims or that you attend church regularly....

    Intention, Jesus 1788  Words | 5  Pages

  • Intervention, Treatment, and Relapse Prevention

    Intervention, treatment, and relapse prevention Heidi Russell BSHS 431 September 17, 2012 Michelle Thomas Intervention, treatment, and relapse prevention This writer interviewed and researched Aegis Medical Systems. Aegis Medical Systems specializes in drug-replacement therapy; a treatment for clients who suffer from opiate addiction while in pursuit of recovery. This writer will elaborate on how Aegis Medical Systems focuses on person-centered intervention and treatment. This...

    Addiction, Coping skill, Drug abuse 1401  Words | 4  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast Psychoanalytic and Person-Centered Therapies

    Running Head: Compare and Contrast Paper Compare and Contrast: Psychoanalytic and Person-Centered Therapies Leslie A. White Central Missouri State University ` The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the differences and similarities associated with Carl Roger’s Client-centered theory and Sigmund Freud’s Psychoanalytic theory. The focus of the comparisons will fall into the three main topic areas: that of optimal personality development, that of the nature of...

    Consciousness, Jacques Lacan, Psychoanalysis 2460  Words | 8  Pages

  • God's Way or Man's Way: Christ-Centered v. Self-Centered Counseling

    Man’s Way: Christ-Centered v. Self-Centered Counseling Elizabeth Raver Liberty University The objective of personal counseling is to set goals and to move towards them in a positive manner, while gaining valuable knowledge and coping skills along the way. There are numerous counseling methods in practical use today. This comparative will focus on biblical-counseling methods versus established alternative methods, such as Cognitive-behavior therapy and the “Rogerian...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy 2188  Words | 9  Pages

  • Intervention

    I first began watching “grown up TV shows”, A&E’s Intervention has been my favorite. Intervention is an Emmy Award winning TV series airing on A&E, that documents the lives and the struggles of several different people facing different types of addictions. These addicts lives are followed and documented and they are under the impression they are filming a documentary. Instead, they are being documented and will be facing an intervention put together by their family and their friends, and faced...

    Addiction, Alcoholism, Drug addiction 638  Words | 2  Pages

  • Person Centered Theory

    of Rogers’s Person-centered Therapy in Self Perspective: Critical Evaluation and Integrative Improvement Date of submission: 10 December 2007 (Monday) This paper was divided into three parts. The first part was to summarize the basic concepts of Rogers’s phenomenological approach of personality. Carl Rogers, who was the pioneered humanistic counselor and psychotherapist, advocated “Client-centered Therapy” (now known as “Person-centered Therapy” derived from...

    Abraham Maslow, Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy 3495  Words | 11  Pages

  • Person-Centered Therapy: The Only Tool for Therapists?

    words P.Reeve; City College, Norwich 08/06/2014 “Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients”. For the purpose of this essay, I will attempt to evaluate the theory that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all they need to treat clients. Therapists will have many different approaches and theories for their interventions, but will arguably all share a common interest, the desire for positive change and outcome...

    Abraham Maslow, Humanistic psychology, Maslow's hierarchy of needs 2378  Words | 10  Pages

  • Fritz Perls's Use of Gestalt Therapy: a Review

    Gestalt is a fascinating approach to therapy with many unique techniques, interventions and goals that set it apart from other approaches. "Self-acceptance, knowledge of the environment, responsibility for choices, and the ability to make contact...are important awareness processes and goals, all of which are based on a here-and-now experiencing that is always changing" (Corey, 2009, p. 200). Fritz Perls demonstrates his Gestalt therapy style in Three Approaches to Psychotherapy: A Film Series...

    Clinical psychology, Fritz Perls, Gestalt psychology 2420  Words | 7  Pages

  • Different Therapies in Psychology

    Psychological Therapies Eclectic Approach → An approach to psychotherapy that uses techniques from various forms of therapy.Psychotherapy → Treatment involving psychological techniques, which consists of interactions between a trained therapist and patient.PsychoanalysisGoals and methods -Psychoanalysis → Created by Sigmund Freud. He believed that the patient’s free associations, resistances, dreams, and transferences (and the therapist’s interpretations of these things), released previously repressed...

    Behaviorism, Carl Jung, Humanistic psychology 763  Words | 3  Pages

  • Health Promotion Interventions

    Understanding Health Promotion Interventions in Nursing Practice Nancy S. Hammack Grand Canyon University: Family Centered Health Promotion NRS 429V Professor Barb McGraw March 24, 2013 Understanding Health Promotion Interventions in Nursing Practice The nursing profession is one of the largest health care professions, providing important opportunities for health promotion with potential to reform health at the legislative level. Health promotion is defined by Kreuter and Devore...

    Health, Health care, Medical terms 1307  Words | 5  Pages

  • Crisis Intervention

    committed suicide and she is distraught about her circumstances. What information would you want to know before intervening? After finding out the necessary information, how would you handle this case? I would follow the Six-Step Model of Crisis Intervention to handle this case. I would first assess the crisis situation. It is very important to do this so that you can make sense of the various causes and reason why the crisis has occurred in the first place. In the case the woman is experiencing the...

    Delusion, Delusional disorder, Emotion 1693  Words | 5  Pages

  • Art Therapy

    13 Art Therapy Research Paper demko, ginni c. There is an amazing amount of methods that are used in order to help a client in need from a clinician. Among those methods are the many techniques of art therapy. There is a strong history that many don’t know about when it comes to the usage of art as a form of therapy. At times, art therapy is the only way a client may be able to communicate what they are feeling. As such, there are a great many of ways and reasons to use art therapy in order...

    Art, Art therapy, Cancer 2599  Words | 7  Pages

  • Occupational Therapy

    Occupational Therapy: The Means to Stroke Recovery Prepared for: Occupational Therapy Students Prepared by: David Bush 12/09/12 Abstract: Early assessment by an occupational therapist ensures that goals are initiated during the acute stroke phase to prevent the development of secondary impairment. Early assessment also maximises the stroke victims recovery. Late occupational therapy intervention jeopardises a stroke victims potential...

    Medicine, Occupational therapy, Stroke 1930  Words | 7  Pages

  • Integrated Systemic Family Therapy

    Narrative Therapy An Integrated Outcome? Introduction Systemic therapy was based on Minuchin’s Structural Therapy model (1968) followed by Bateson's cybernetic model (1972) The first order cybernetic model considerd that problems within a family system should be focused on by strategically solving problems, meeting family goals and help change a person's dysfunctional behaviour. D Shazer (1985). These concepts in Systemic therapy were known as the major paradigms and were taught by therapists...

    Family, Family therapy, Narrative therapy 1903  Words | 6  Pages

  • Interventions Case Study

     Vanessa Cuffee Interventions Case Study November 30, 2014 Amanda Williams “A Crisis Involving Chronic Back Pain” in Ch 9 Introduction Pain is a physiological response in living things. The human body, pain may be an underlying symptom of a disorder. Pain may arise from damage in the tissue and subsequent infiltration of immune cells to the damaged region. Similarly, pain may be due to injury in the nerves which play critical role as sensory system of the body (Bishop PM, 1950). ...

    Back pain, Chronic pain, Health care 1199  Words | 6  Pages

  • Art Therapy

    Disadvantages of Art Therapy Phua Yu Ting HELP University Outline I. Introduction A. Opener: B. Thesis statement: There are advantages and disadvantages of art therapy. II. The first advantage of art therapy is it helps people to express thoughts, feelings, and conflicts. A. Adults 1. Self-discovery and self-expression 2. Emotional growth B. Children 1. Relief stress 2. Express feelings with limited vocabularies III. Art therapy provides individuals with control over specific person to communicate;...

    Art, Art therapy, Arts 2061  Words | 10  Pages

  • Gestalt Therapy

    Gestalt Therapy Gestalt therapy was largely developed by Fritz Perls and his wife, Laura. Together they created a theory that is based on the premise that individuals must be understood in the context of their ongoing relationship with the environment. To better understand that, one must review the key concepts, therapeutic process, and the techniques of application. The first key concept of Gestalt therapy is its view of human nature. Perls believed that genuine knowledge is the product of...

    Concept, Esalen Institute, Fritz Perls 1147  Words | 4  Pages

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