Person Centered Therapy

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PCT Essay 1


What do you consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of the person-centered approach? What concepts and methods might build effective bonds with clients? Discuss any shortcomings in staying with this orientation.

Word Count: 2214



PCT Essay 2


This essay would attempt to explain the fundamental concepts and therapeutic methodologies that might build effective bonds with clients. It would also discuss the strengths and weaknesses within the person-centered approach. The key concepts include self-actualization, conditions of worth, the fully functioning person, and the phenomenological perspectives. The therapeutic methodologies consist of empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard. In person-centered therapy, the therapist focuses on here and now experiences within the therapeutic relationship to help the client become aware of his or her true self. The goal of this approach is to create the conditions that will encourage self-actualization and to create an environment that will help the client to narrow the gap between real self and ideal self. The acceptance of the client has to be present for them to empower change. To achieve this, therapists should provide facilitating conditions that include accurate empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard.


PCT Essay 3


What Do You Consider To Be The Strengths And Weaknesses Of The Person-Centered Approach? What Concepts And Methods Might Build Effective Bonds With Clients? DiscussAny Shortcomings In Staying With This Orientation.

In recent years, there has been an influx in people seeking therapy, for a multitude of reasons relating to personal growth, marital conflict, and work dissatisfaction, to name a few. According to Corey [2005], one of the recognized theories of counseling was developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s as a reaction against traditionally directive psychoanalytic approaches in individual therapy. Client-centered, non-directive, or Rogerian therapy, and currently known as person-centered therapy (PCT), is an approach to counseling and psychotherapy that takes a positive and optimistic view of individuals. This places much of the responsibility for the treatment process on the client, with the therapist taking a nondirective role [Corey, 2005]. Pescitelli [1996] cites (Shaffer, 1978), "PCT involves the therapist's entry into the client's un^jue, phenomenological world. In mirroring this world, the therapist does not disagree or point out contradictions." The therapist also should not attempt to delve into the unconscious. The focus is



PCT Essay 4

on immediate conscious experience. The person-centered approach (PCA) represents a way of being, over a set of techniques in therapy. Stressing understanding and care. Discouraging diagnosis, advice, and persuasion (Murdock, 2009).

Counselling And Methodologies: Concepts And Methods Of Person-Centered Therapy


Some of the related changes that PCT seeks to foster in the counselees include closer agreement between the client's idealized and actual selves, better self-understanding, lower levels of defensiveness, guilt, and insecurity, more positive and comfortable relationships with others, and an increased capacity to experience and express their feelings [Corey, 2005].

Rogers emphasized the attitude and personal characteristics of the therapist, coupled with the client-therapist permissive and free relationship, characterized by acceptance, warmth, and freedom from coercion, are the prime determinant for a positive outcome in counseling. Therapy should not be merely solving problems. Rather, therapy should guide clients with their personal growth enabling them to better cope with their problems now and in the future [Corey, 2005].

Some fundamental characteristics of the person-centered approach (PCA) are encouraging...
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