P&G Gillette Merger

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 165
  • Published : January 27, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
P&G-Gillette

Introduction
On January 28th 2005 P&G agreed to buy Gillette for $57bn (£30). Gillette was the number 1 in razor accessories and proctor gamble was number 1 in consumer products, a marriage of the best in their respective industries. The merger of the two companies created “the world’s largest consumer products conglomerate.” Gillette was a leader in its category of razors and batteries, merging with P&G provided it access to P&G’s technology and marketing skills. P&G added Gillette razors , Right Guard deodorant and Duracell batteries to its more than 300 consumer brands, including Ivory Soap, Head and Shoulders shampoo, Pringles, Crest toothpaste and Bounty paper towels. Company Background

P&G
P&G a fortune 500 company headquartered at down Cincinnati, Ohio. P&G is manufacturer of wide range of consumer products ranging from Ivory Soap, Head and Shoulders shampoo, Pringles, Crest toothpaste and Bounty paper towels. P&G reported revenue of $82.6 billion in 201. P&G was started in 1837 when William Proctor, a candlemaker, and James Gamble, a soapmaker, met in Cincinnati to become business partners and Proctor and Gamble was born. In 1858–1859, sales reached $1 million. By this point, approximately 80 employees worked for Procter & Gamble. In 1880, P&G discovered and marketed an inexpensive soap that floats on water called Ivory soap. William Arnett Procter, William Procter's grandson, started a profit sharing program with the company’s workforce in 1887. This program eliminated the chances of workers going to strike. Company opened many facilities to cover up the exponentially increasing demand. In 1920’s and 1930’s when radio because popular, P&G sponsored a number of shows and soon the radio shows were known as ‘soap operas’. P&G expanded into new countries in both areas: manufacturing and product sales and with the acquisition of Thomas Hedley co. in 1930, P&G became an international corporation. Large number of products and brand names were introduced over time, and P&G branched out into new areas. “Tide”, laundry detergent, and “Prell” shampoo was introduced by the company in 1946 and 1947 respectively. First toothpaste “Crest” containing fluoride was sold by P&G in 1955. In 1957 company branched out again with the purchase of Charmin Paper Mills and began manufacturing toilet paper and other paper products. Once again focusing on laundry, Procter & Gamble began making "Downy" fabric softener in 1960 and "Bounce" fabric softener sheets in 1972. Prior to 1960 Johnson and Johnson were manufacturing disposable diaper called “Chrux” but P&G came out with one of the most revolutionary products on the market called "Pampers", first test-marketed in 1961. Babies always wore cloth diapers, which were leaky and labour intensive to wash. Pampers provided a convenient alternative, albeit at the environmental cost of more waste requiring landfilling. To diversify its product line and to increase profits P&G acquired a number of companies. Some of the acquisitions included Folgers Coffee, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals (the makers of Pepto-Bismol), Richardson-Vicks, Noxell (Noxzema), Shulton's Old Spice, Max Factor, and the Iams Company. In 1994, P&G was in top headlines, the management was placed in an unusual position of testifying in front of court in engaging with interest rate derivatives which they were not much capable to understand and incurred huge losses from that leveraged position and later on they sued the Bankers trust for the fraud. In 1996, P&G was again in headlines as Food and Drug Administration approved a new Product developed by company called Olestra. As the brand was called Olean, it was a lower-calorie substitute for fat used in cooking potato chips and other snacks but during its development stage it was associated with anal leakage and gastrointestinal difficulties in humans. On 28th January 2005...
tracking img