Visual Analysis of Best Buy Commercial

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Cornerstone|
Investigating the Effectiveness of Super Bowl Ads|
Visual Analysis|
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Kelsey Schumacher|
2/15/2013|

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Kelsey Schumacher
Mrs. Heimann
Spring Conerstone
February 15, 2013
Investigating the Effectiveness of Super Bowl Ads
On Sunday February 3, 2013 an estimated 108.4 million people were perched in front of their TV’s watching the Super Bowl. The Super Bowl not only holds the record for most watched event on television, but it is also notorious for broadcasting some of the year's best, and most expensive, commercials. This year was no exception. Everyone is entitled to their personal opinion and although some analysts are saying advertisers didn’t get the job done this year, I beg to differ. With 108.4 million people watching in 34 different languages throughout the 232 different countries and territories, there is a lot of diversity to account for. This is why I chose an Ad I thought most people watching could relate to; Best Buy’s “Asking Amy”.

This commercial stars Amy Poehler a well-known actress, comedienne, producer and writer. She’s best known for her comical skits in Saturday Night Live as well as her role as a surrogate mother in the 2008 movie Baby Mama. Her most recent performance has been a role as the Deputy Director of the Parks department in the TV series Parks and Recreation. Of course she doesn’t lack any humor when it comes to the commercial. It opens up with a Best Buy worker approaching Amy. He asks, “Hi, may I answer any questions?” Amy begins to open her mouth then a cunning look comes across her face her mouth closes and she smirks. This all happens within the first three seconds of the commercial. It continues with many short 3-5 second shots of Amy asking numerous questions about many of the products Best Buy carries; everything from cell phones to a washing machine. The Ad ends with Amy asking the Best Buy man, “Will this read 50 shades of grey to me in a sexy voice?” He answers no and she responds in a seductive voice with, “Will you?” Text pops up on the screen saying, “Thousands of experts ready to help” Then Best Buy logo pops up with the twitter symbol beneath it and “hash tag” InfiniteAnswers (#InfiniteAnswers). The company has obviously been identified as Best Buy and their message was very clear “We’re here to help”.

The consumer needs were also easily identifiable; actually, it was the main point of the entire Ad. Having the latest technology has become a huge cultural norm in the United States, but is also seen in other cultures throughout the world. With all the new gadgets coming out many people are going to feel overwhelmed, especially the older generations. Over 50% of the world’s population is under the age of 30 and that 50% grew up with technology. This means the other 50%, who did not grow up with technology, may feel left in the dust if they don’t conform to society's ever changing norms. Amy Poehler fits into the 50% of the population who didn’t grow up with rapidly changing technology. She portrays her generation (and prior ones) as having an infinite amount of questions.

Although the “older” generations are typically going to have more questions, I don’t believe the targeted audience was just them. By showing many of the products that Best Buy offers, it attracts younger consumers. Especially when demonstrating the new touch screen tablets, phones, 3D TV etc... Since it’s all VERY new, even the young consumers may not have the latest technology yet. I also feel this Ad appeals to a diverse age range because the Best Buy logo at the end and the Twitter hash tag below it. About 74% of twitter users are between the ages of 15 and 25. Besides age range this Ad is more appealing to people in the middle to upper class. We can infer this because all the products shown were somewhat pricey; definitely $75 and up. The lower class part of the population wouldn’t have the money to buy one of these products as they are still not seen as a...
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