Undercover Intelligence: a Look at Gardner's Theory

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LaWesha Bush
June 6, 2010
Undercover Intelligence:
A look at Gardner’s Theory
Have you ever felt as though you were not as smart as your peers because your grade on a test was lower than average? Has anyone ever told you that the way you perform a certain task is extraordinary, and they wish they had half the talent you possess? The traditional methods of testing, those that are based on writing, reading, and mathematics, are having some of the most extraordinary individuals marked off as not being as intelligent as they truly are. Even though Gardner was a very studious individual, and had done well on standardized test, he was convinced that this method of defining who was, or was not, intelligent was incorrect. After working with normal and gifted children, brain-damaged adults, extensive surveying of sets of literature and disciplines, Gardner arrived at a working definition of ‘an intelligence’ and devised a set of criteria of what counts as an intelligence. Gardner describes intelligence as a biological and psychological potential to solve problems and/ or create products that are valued in one or more cultural contexts. Gardner identifies seven types of intelligence. Gardner believed that there are several areas within our brains in which learning stems from, or is supported by. He listed the multiple intelligences as linguistic, logical-mathematical, musical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal. Linguistic intelligence is the ability to manipulate language, meaning it involves the transfer of information through writing, reading, and listening to the spoken word, such as conversation, debates or discussions. Logical-Mathematical intelligence is the ability to detect patterns,...
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