Tqm - Pak Suzuki

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TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT

TERM REPORT
ON
SUZUKI PAKISTAN

Submitted to
SIR NAVEED A.KHAN
Submiited by
* HARIS AHMED KHAN
* UMAR MASOOD
* ERUM PARVEEN SHEIKH

BAHRIA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT AND COMPUTER SCIENCES, KARACHI

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First of all, we would like to express our deep gratitude to Almighty Allah, who enabled us to undertake such an important task and to study about Pak Suzuki and the Strategies to operate in Pakistan Automobile Market.

We also wish to acknowledge the valuable guidance provided by our respected teacher Mr. Naveed A Khan. He always motivated and encouraged us in the completion of this report.

We are thankful to Mr. Abdul Aziz who is the Production Manager in Pak Suzuki at Bin Qasim Plant Karachi and entire Pak Suzuki Management. They appreciated the efforts of Bahria University Karachi Campus. They have provided all the relevant data as well as other information relating to the important independent variables.

History
In 1909, Michio Suzuki (1887-1982) founded the Suzuki Loom Works in the small seacoast village of Hamamatsu, Japan. Business boomed as Suzuki built weaving looms for Japan's giant silk industry. In 1929, Michio Suzuki invented a new type of weaving machine, which was exported overseas. Suzuki filed as many as 120 patents and utility model rights. The company's first 30 years focused on the development and production of these exceptionally complex machines. Despite the success of his looms, Suzuki realized his company had to diversify and he began to look at other products. Based on consumer demand, he decided that building a small car would be the most practical new venture. The project began in 1937, and within two years Suzuki had completed several compact prototype cars. These first Suzuki motor vehicles were powered by a then-innovative, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, four-cylinder engine. It featured a cast aluminum crankcase and gearbox and generated 13 horsepower (9.7 kW) from a displacement of less than 800cc. With the onset of World War II, production plans for Suzuki's new vehicles were halted when the government declared civilian passenger cars a "non-essential commodity." At the conclusion of the war, Suzuki went back to producing looms. Loom production was given a boost when the U.S. government approved the shipping of cotton to Japan. Suzuki's fortunes brightened as orders began to increase from domestic textile manufacturers. But the joy was short-lived as the cotton market collapsed in 1951. Faced with this colossal challenge, Suzuki's thoughts went back to motor vehicles. After the war, the Japanese had a great need for affordable, reliable personal transportation. A number of firms began offering "clip-on" gas-powered engines that could be attached to the typical bicycle. Suzuki's first two-wheel ingenuity came in the form of a motorized bicycle called, the "Power Free." Designed to be inexpensive and simple to build and maintain, the 1952 Power Free featured a 36 cc, one horsepower, two-stroke engine. An unprecedented feature was the double-sprocket gear system, enabling the rider to either pedal with the engine assisting, pedal without engine assist, or simply disconnect the pedals and run on engine power alone. Introduction

Following the terms of the Joint Venture Agreement between Suzuki Motor Corporation of Japan (SMC) and Pakistan Automobile Corporation (PACO), Pak Suzuki Motor Company Limited (PSMCL) was incorporated as a public limited company in August 1983. The new company assumed the assets, including production facilities, of Awami Autos Limited. PSMCL started commercial operations in January 1984 with the primary objective of passenger cars, pick ups, vans and 4x4 vehicles. The groundbreaking ceremony of the company’s green field automobile plant at Bin Qasim was performed by the then prime...
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