The Relationship of Engagement and Job Satisfaction in Working Samples

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 91
  • Published : February 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
This article was downloaded by: [122.174.74.152] On: 05 February 2013, At: 06:25 Publisher: Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied
Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/vjrl20

The Relationship of Engagement and Job Satisfaction in Working Samples Gene M. Alarcon & Joseph B. Lyons
a a a

Air Force Research Laboratory Version of record first published: 18 Jul 2011.

To cite this article: Gene M. Alarcon & Joseph B. Lyons (2011): The Relationship of Engagement and Job Satisfaction in Working Samples, The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 145:5, 463-480 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223980.2011.584083

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE Full terms and conditions of use: http://www.tandfonline.com/page/termsand-conditions This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents will be complete or accurate or up to date. The accuracy of any instructions, formulae, and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages

whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material.

Downloaded by [122.174.74.152] at 06:25 05 February 2013

The Journal of Psychology, 2011, 145(5), 463–480

The Relationship of Engagement and Job Satisfaction in Working Samples GENE M. ALARCON JOSEPH B. LYONS Air Force Research Laboratory

Downloaded by [122.174.74.152] at 06:25 05 February 2013

ABSTRACT. The present study explored the factor structure of engagement and its relationship with job satisfaction. The authors hypothesize that work engagement comprises 3 constructs: vigor, dedication, and absorption. Using structural equation modeling, the authors analyze data from 3 archival data sets to determine the factor structure of engagement. In addition, they examine the hypothesis that engagement and job satisfaction are separate but related constructs, using structural equation modeling and hierarchical regression. The authors test models in which engagement and job satisfaction items loaded onto a single latent variable and 1 in which they loaded onto 2 separate variables. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis indicate engagement has 3 factors. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regressions indicate engagement and job satisfaction are separate constructs. Last, hierarchical regressions demonstrated the constructs have different relationships with the areas of work–life scale. Implications for theory and research are discussed. Keywords: construct validity, engagement, job satisfaction

POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY HAS ENJOYED AN INCREASING EMPHASIS in the organizational literature in the past decade, with particular emphasis given to engagement. Engagement is defined as a positive relationship with one’s work characterized by a sense of meaning, competence, and impact (Macey & Schneider, 2008). Research on the topic has burgeoned from the burnout literature. Originally thought of as the antithesis of burnout, research has demonstrated it is indeed a separate construct from burnout (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001). In addition, research has also differentiated work engagement from organizational commitment and job involvement (Hallberg & Schaufeli, 2006). However, despite criticisms that work engagement may simply be...
tracking img