Employee Engagement

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1.0 Introduction
1.1 Define employee engagement
1.2 Analyse the three principle dimensions of employee engagement (the emotional, the cognitive and the physical) 1.3 Compare and contrast employee engagement with other related concepts; ‘flow’, organisational commitment, job involvement and job satisfaction 3.1 Explain why employee engagement is an increasingly vital dimension of HR polices, strategies and practices 3.2 Evaluate the business benefits likely to accrue from a culture of employee engagement – benefits for the organization, its executives/managers, its workforce and its customers 3.3 Explain the application of employee engagement through job design, discretionary behavior, role autonomy and organizational citizenship. 4.1 Analyse the findings of recent research evidence concerning the incidence of employee engagement

4.2 Assess differences in levels of employee engagement based on gender, demographic and other factors

1.0Introduction:

This assignment has been written to;
1.Define employee engagement and explain how it differs, if at all, from related concepts like organisational commitment, employer involvement and job satisfaction. 2.Outline the findings of key recent studies on employee engagement in practice including the extent to which gender, demographic and other factors influence levels of engagement. Why is employment engagement a ‘hot topic’ for many organisations? 3.What are the benefits of having an engaged workforce and what steps can an organisation take to create a culture of employee engagement through such as job design, discretionary behaviour, role autonomy, etc.? 1.1Define employee engagement

Employee engagement is when an employee is committed to the organisation, their colleagues, the job they are doing and their willingness to go the extra mile by exerting discretionary behaviours that cannot be ‘stipulated’ in the employment contract. Where an employee or workforce does not have this rounded combination of commitments employee engagement is not maximised to its fullest potential. (CIPD 2010) Employee engagement is connection – when we become disconnected we disengage. ‘Employee engagement is the art and science of engaging people in authentic and recognized connections to strategy, roles, performance, organization, community, relationship, customers, development, energy, and happiness to leverage, sustain, and transform work into results’. (Zinger, 2010 ) 1.2 Analyse the three principle dimensions of employee engagement (the emotional, the cognitive and the physical). Kahn (1990) explains that employee engagement requires employees to invest emotional, cognitive and physical energy to fully deploy themselves into a work role or task. Shirom (2003) refers to these three components as ‘vigor’ and explains that investing in all three areas represents a positive affective response to an employee’s job and work environment. (Bligh, Riggio 2013) Emotional energy could involve the social element at work such as engaging with fellow colleagues, sharing ideas, best practice, and knowledge, working as a team and having good working relationships that foster engagement between the parties. Creating an environment that encourages this social energy is required to achieve this; if for instance an employer has a no talking policy or discourages general chatting in the office it is highly likely that these social benefits to the organisation will be severely affected or non-existent, affecting engagement levels at an organisational level. Cognitive energy amounts to the intellectual output an employee puts in to the role, project or task. Hence it is important that employers define jobs and tasks to adequately stretch an employee’s cognitive ability and needs. Autonomy and decision making parameters could be addressed and redefined to encourage greater cognitive input at work. The benefits of such are likely to...
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