The Influence of Outdoor Advertising on Consumer Brand Preference

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Petty and Cacioppo (1983) states that the goal of advertising is to influence consumer behaviour. This statement has important psychological implications since as Percy and Woodside (1983) note there is a strong connection between advertising, consumer psychology and social psychology. In order to design advertisements that ultimately lead to intended behaviour, it is first important to understand how advertising works and the main psychological processes related to it.

A)Methodologies for data collection

Fishbein’s multiattribute attitude model has been a popular tool for understanding the formation of attitude toward advertisement. According to Fishbein (1975, cited in Mitchell & Olson, 1981), an attitude is a function of a person’s salient beliefs at a given point in time. Fishbein’s view on attitudes has a strong emphasis on cognition since as Peter and Olson (2005 p. 51) state, beliefs are consumer’s subjective understandings of information produced by interpretation processes. In other words, beliefs are formed by the cognitive system. This interpretation suggests that in the advertising context product attribute beliefs are the only variables affecting attitude formation and change. Since Fishbein’s attitude model has mainly been used in marketing research studies the general concept of interest has been on consumer’s attitudes toward brand attribute beliefs and their impact on purchase intentions (Mitchell, Olson 1981)


Studies concerning attitudes and purchase intentions have showed that brand attributes may not be the only variables influencing brand preference. In their study, Mitchell and Olson (1981) aimed to validate Fishbein’s proposition regarding attitude formation. Indeed they found that brand attribute beliefs act as a mediator to attitude formation. However, they discovered that, in effect, attitude towards advertising seemed to explain brand attitude formation. Mitchell and Olson’s (1981) preliminary findings on...
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