The Holocaust and Its Aftermath on Central Europe

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The Holocaust and Its Aftermath on Central Europe
Nicole Walsh Sheridan College

For the 12 years that Germany was ruled by the Nazi Party, a central belief was that there existed in society, certain people who were dangerous and needed to be eliminated for German society to flourish and survive. They included Gypsies, Poles, and Russians, but always and most certainly, the Jews. The Nazis condemned the Jews to death and there was no escape. No change in their behaviour or their beliefs would help them escape their fate. At every stage of the war, the Germans used their military power to dominate and terrorize the Jews. Thousands of Nazis and their accomplices searched the cities and countryside of Europe to eliminate Jews. This was a goal to which the Nazis devoted themselves completely. The Jews were in turn abandoned by their neighbours and by the world. They had no country of their own to which they could turn, and no means of self defense. The majority of the populations in which they lived remained indifferent to their fate. Many even helped the Nazis to imprison and deport Jews to the death camps.

When the war finally came to a halt, the impact on cultural, economy and social well-being continued. In this essay I will discuss how the aftermath of the holocaust had profound economic, social and cultural effects on central Europe, showing to a degree how the tragedy influenced the developments around the continent.

The first consequence of the Holocaust was an economic one. There are several perspectives to this problem. The Jewish population had had a strong involvement in the economic, cultural and political life of the countries in Central Europe. The Jewish population were also active in the financial sector, in the manufacturing industries and several other economic sectors. Their...
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