Teacher-Coach Role Onflict

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Teacher-Role Conflict

KIN 1004
February 18, 2013

Teacher-coach role conflict is an issue that is common to most physical education teachers. Physical educators usually express high interests in coaching since the occupation of physical education is synonymous with sport. In fact, most believe that physical educators must teach and coach simply because of tradition, therefore forcing a majority of physical educators into this dual role of coach and teacher. Role conflict refers to individuals involved in certain roles that are competing against each other. Individuals must meet the demands of each role, hence creating potential conflict and the excessive stress added by the attempt to meet every expectation. The purpose of this paper is to examine the issues of how teacher-coaches perceive their roles, the impact on students from this conflict and how teachers-coaches must fulfill the demands required from each role. Perceptions and Performance of Dual Roles in Teaching-Coaching

Teachers-coaches frequently perceive disparities when attempting to fulfill the duties of the two roles, that of the teacher, and the role of the coach. All teacher-coaches may perceive conflict differently based on their experiences and ideas of their required duties for each role. The way a teacher-coach perceives and performs their role somewhat involves critical concepts in the recruitment stage of teacher socialization: subjective warrant and the apprenticeship of observation. These concepts state, “subjective warrant is an individual’s perceptions of the requirements for teaching, and their ability to fulfill these requirements, whereas the apprenticeship of observation is the ideas and beliefs one holds about the job of teaching based on experiences in school as a student” (Gaudreault, 2012). How teacher and coaches interpret their occupation

Teacher-coaches obviously will have differences in the way that they perceive the different disparities between the demands of dual roles. These differences may be a result from their previous experiences as a student, athlete, or coach. First of all, it is important to take a look at whether teacher-coaches had different perceptions about their occupation. Subjective warrant and the apprenticeship of observation significantly contribute to whether individuals have different perceptions of the demands required for teaching-coaching. According to Richards and Templin, “pursuing a career in coaching most people see teaching physical education as the only viable route to becoming a coach” (Richards & Templin, 2012, p. 167). Teacher-coaches must recognize that they are directly responsible for the perception of physical education; as a result performance may greatly be affected by the teacher-coaches perception of role importance.

Distinguishing responsibilities between the teacher and coach One could argue that teacher-coaches perform similar structured activities during class or practice. There are several responsibilities that being a teacher and coach share, however there are some conflicting role demands that make teaching a full-time job as well as coaching a full-time job of its own. According to Kwon, “in physical education, the development of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor competencies as well as an affinity for lifelong physical activity are typically cited as objectives, while athletics seeks to develop students who are talented in a specific sport and to produce winning teams” (Kwon (Donovan, 1997), 2010). Some common components that are nearly the same for each role would include tasks such as verbal instruction, demonstration of the skills to be performed, extending or refining tasks, and checking for understanding. Therefore, considering the different characteristics, skills, and requirements of each career, it is safe to assume that role conflict will occur with an individual.

How politics influence teacher-coaches behavior
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