Taylor and Mayo

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‘Compare and contrast the attitude of then Scientific School of Management (Taylor et al) with those of the Human Relations Movement (Mayo et al) with regard to people at work.’


In order for us to compare and/or contrast two diverse schools of management, it is important for us to understand management in general, and the specific principles and theories comprising the two.

Kreitner defines management as, “..the process of working with and through others to effectively achieve organizational objectives by efficiently using limited resources in the changing enviornment.” Dr. Ray Donnelly, in much simpler terms, describes it as, “Management is about getting other people to do what you want them to do.” [management explanation!]

The very vast world of management, can be divided into 6 basic schools of thought: 1. Early perspectives; 2. Classical Management Theory; 3. Neo-Classical Theory - Human Relations Approach; 4.Behavioural Science Approach - Organisational Humanism; 5.Management Science/Operational Research; 6. Modern Management. The two most interesting and conflicting schools of thought, were the Classical Management Theory vs. the Neo-Classical Theory - Human Relations Approach. Classical Management advocated rational economic view, scientific management [Taylor et al], administrative principles [Fayol et al], and bureaucratic organization [Weber et al]; on the other hand, the neo-classical theory, emphasized on the human factor of management, which later helped develop the Behavioural Science Approach. While there were many management professionals and theorists who contributed to these movements, the two most important individuals, who started these schools of thought, were Frederick Winslow Taylor, and Elton Mayo, respectively.

‘Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1917), also known as the father of the school of Scientific Management, was an engineer by training. He...
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