Solid Waste Management

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SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES WITHIN INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS IN NAIROBI: A CASE STUDY OF MATHARE

BY

Rosemary Kwamboka

TABLE OF CONTENTSii
LIST OF TABLESiii
DEDICATIONiv
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSv
ABSTRACTvi
1.0 INTRODUCTION.1
1.2 Background of the Study4
1.3 Problem Statement.5
1.4 Justification6
1.5 The purpose of the study6
1.6 Hypothesis6
1.7 Specific objectives6
2.0 LITERATURE REVIEW7
3.0 METHODOLOGY11
3.1 Area and population of Study12
4.0 RESULTS14
5.0 DISCUSSION17
5.1 Statistical Analysis19
5.2 Conclusions and Recommendations20
7.0 REFERENCES23
6.0 APPENDIX25

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Average Family Size and Amount of Wastes Generated14 Table 2: Income Status of Respondents (Per Month)14
Table 3: Seriousness of Solid Waste Management Problem as Perceived by the Respondents.14 Table 4: Cleanliness of the Area14
Table 5: Matching Educational Levels with Methods of Solid Waste Disposal.15 Table 6: Frequency of Solid Waste Removal by Government15
Table 7: Environmental Awareness Campaign15
Table 8: Household Solid Waste Composition in Mathare15
Table 9: Rates of Household Solid Waste Generation in Mathare16 Table 10: ANOVA Statistic for HoI16
Table 11: ANOVA F- Ratio Table for HoI16

ABSTRACT
A solid waste management appraisal was undertaken in Mathare, an area affected by poor solid waste management strategy as evidenced by many informal dumping sites. Questionnaires were administered seeking data on demographic and waste management in four zones of the area. The rate of waste generation was determined by sorting and weighing of solid wastes produced by people living in the same house. The weighing was done every Friday of the week for one month. The weights obtained were subjected to ANOVA to determine variation across the four zones. Chi-Square test was used to investigate whether there was relationship between waste produced and family size. It was also used to test relationship between waste disposal methods, level of education and income levels.F-calculated = 3.34(2.55), while the value of F from table is 2.49 hence there was significant variation in the composition of waste generated. Chi-square showed that there was significant relationship between solid waste produced and family size.The critical value of X2 of 2 at 0.05 level was 5.99 from table (less than 164 calculated). Hence waste disposal methods also depended on income and education level. In general management of solid waste in Mathare calls for more concerted efforts in the areas of public enlightenment campaigns, regular collection and disposal of generated wastes and extension of services to cover more inhabitants of the area.

1.0 INTRODUCTION.
Wastes are inevitable part of human activity. The problems associated with waste can be traced back to the very beginning of civilization, when humans gathered in communities (Priestly, 1968). Wastes generated then were contained and disposed off by natural processes. However, as population increased and villages grew into towns and then into cities, the amount of waste generated increased. Consequently, wastes were dumped indiscriminately into waterways, empty lands and access roads. The appalling conditions gave rise to epidemics like the ‘‘Black Plague’’ that destroyed large population of Europe in the 14th century (Priestly, 1968). Similar conditions were also experienced in the other continents. The industrial revolution that took place in Europe in the 19th century marked a turning point in waste management. It brought with it, among other things, migration of people from rural areas to towns and cities in search of jobs. The resulting concentration of people in towns and cities gave rise to alarming proportion of wastes being dumped in the streets and waterways. Legislations were passed by the governments of the day in order to curb the indiscriminate dumping of waste. Progress was slow until a positive link was established...
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