Social Network Effects on Career

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Social Networking Effects on Career
(Make-Up)

By: Alejandra M. Teran,
Paulette Trevino,

Orlando Flores (removed from group make-up research paper)

Dr. Kai S. Koong

MIS 6391.01

13 December 2012

Updated
Contents

Abstract ……………………………………………………………………………….. P3 Introduction …………………………………………………………………………… P4 Statement of Problems …………..……………………………………………………. P6 Statement of Objectives…………..…………………………………………………… P7 Methodology ………………………………………………………………………….. P8 Findings ………………………………………………………………………………. P9 Limitations ……………………………………………………………………………. P11 Conclusions and Implications………………………………………………………… P15 References …………………………………………………………………………….. P17 Appendix ..…………………………………………………………………………….. P19

Abstract
Research has demonstrated the effects of social networking can either hinder or assist with advancement on career success. However, empirical studies have demonstrated how social networking websites can influence others’ evaluation of job candidates. Much peered-reviewed literature indicates others' judgments of characteristics or attributes of a potential employment candidate are based on information obtained from social networking sites. Often times, the evaluations gathered from networking working sites by employers about the candidate may be accurate. The Internet has changed hiring practices; however, the use of social networking sites used for recruiting, hiring or terminating an individual are relatively new. This study provides sample data to demonstrate the impact of social networking effects on career.

Introduction
A study by W. C. Jacobsen and R. Forste postulates that little is known about the influence electronic media use has on the academic and social lives of university students. Their study, titled The wired generation: academic and social outcomes of electronic media use among university students, suggests there is a “negative relationship between the use of various types of electronic media and first-semester grades… [and] a positive association between social-networking-site use, cellular-phone communication, and face-to-face social interaction.” This positive association demonstrates the possible skills our “wired generation” has industrialized in order to gain employment opportunities. However, due to the recently increased involvement of many employers searching through social networking sites to determine recruitment, hiring or termination, the negative impact of electronic media usage on grades can be metaphorically compared to the impact on career effects. Social networking has its positives, but many in the technologically wired generation have yet to learn the dire consequences of naïve, negative self-publicity on sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, among others. Using Facebook as our only medium, we present several violations addressing the negative effects illicit comments, compromising pictures, concerning networking “friends”, and misleading personal information have on potential employment opportunities. The importance of the present study is to highlight employment violations that are organizationally relevant and available in social networking sites. Employers often seek information from job applicants to determine suitability in their organizations. Some employers might try and learn something about an applicant’s personality by gathering information on Facebook that is not relevant to the job (Kluemper & Rosen, 2009). Although such determinations are based on various characteristics, applicant personality is one that garners particular interest. Personality can be defined as uniquely identifying traits paired as indicators of behavioral tendencies in operational contexts (Bohnert & Ross, 2010). Information pertaining to applicant personality may be collected formally or informally from different sources within and outside the organization. According to Davison, Maraist and Bing (2011), some researchers have examined whether social...
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