Selling-Skills

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Division A ISCS WAKAD

GROUP- ROLL NO 41-50
A-41 NEHA PATIL
A-42 POOJA SHARMA
A-43 PRADEEP SHARMA
A-45 PRASHANT SHARMA
A-46 PREETI RANI
A-47 PRIYANK JAIN
A-48 RAHUL SHARMA
A-49 RAJAN
A-50 RAVIJ SHAH

SPIN SELLING APPROACH

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What is the Goal of Questioning?
• To uncover needs

– Implicit needs

– Explicit needs
– Implicit need – a statement of a buyer’s problem, dissatisfaction or difficulty with a current situation – Explicit need – a clear statement of a buyer’s want, desire or intention to act

In smaller sales, the more implied needs you can uncover, the better chances you have of closing the sale.

In larger sales, implied needs are simply a starting point. What matters here is not how many you uncover but what you do after you uncover them.

S-Situation questions
• Gather background information and develop understanding of the context of the sale. • In big sales, minimize the small talk and focus on finding background detail that can be used to make sense of the buyer's business situation. • Context creates meaning. This is about understanding the wider context before you zoom into the details.  • IMPACT: Least powerful of the SPIN questions. Can be negative . Most people ask too many.

SO
➢ ELIMINATE UNNECESSARY QUESTIONS
➢ DO YOU HOMEWORK THOROUGHLY

• What equipment are you using now?
• How long have you had it?
• Is it purchased or leased?
• How many people use it?

Every good seller begins the sales call by assessing the terrain, by asking questions to clarify the customer's current situation. So Situation Questions are essential, but here's the surprise. Huthwaite's research found that, Do ask Situation Questions, but be sure they're necessary ones. Don't ask a question to elicit information that you easily could have obtained before beginning the call . And know that, when overused, these questions bore the customer.

PROBLEM Questions
Explore customer problems, dissatisfactions, difficulties and concerns • Ask questions to uncover problems which your product can address. But the tendency is.. • If you are selling Tractors, ask about maintenance costs, breakdowns and so on… • If you are selling Life Insurance, ask about how many dependents the person has… • A trap here is to dive straight into presenting the benefits of what you are selling. You may know the problem, but they do not!

Going straight to the sales pitch will just get you objections

• Are you satisfied with your present equipment?
• What are the disadvantages of the way you’re doing it now? • How difficult is it to process orders with your present system? • What reliability problems does your equipment have now?

• How concerned are you about . . . ?”
• “Does it worry you that . . . ?”
• “How difficult do you find it to . . . ?”
• “Is there a risk of . . . ?”
• “What sort of problems do you get with . . . ?”
• “How happy are you with . . . ?”
• “Are you satisfied with the level of . . . ?”
• “Is it hard to cope with . . . ?”
• “How well are you able to cope with . . . ?”
• “What sort of dissatisfaction do you have with . . . ?” • What prevents you from achieving that objective?

Implication questions
• Instead of telling them the problem they have (which is also likely to raise objections), the goal is now to get them to see (and feel!) the problem. By asking questions which draw out the implications of the problem, they get to feel the pain that will drive them towards your product.  • Link isolated problems by examining their effect on customer business and organization • "if this problem is not solved, what are the undesirable consequences?". • The goal of implication questions is to help break down the problems of specific customers in order to make implied needs...
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