“Self Discipline in High School Influences Students Academic Abilities”

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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

ADVANCED EXPOSITORY AND RESEARCH WRITING

“SELF DISCIPLINE IN HIGH SCHOOL INFLUENCES STUDENTS ACADEMIC ABILITIES”

AN ACADEMIC RESEARCH PAPER SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FUFILMENT OF THE COURSE WRITING 1002

INTRODUCTION
One of the most keenly debated issues in American societies is whether the academic abilities of high school students are influenced by their level of intelligence quotients or by other factors such as self discipline. Both social and experimental scientist has through various researches and survey analysis tried to solve this controversial topic in children education in order to figure the appropriate course in child development

In a paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington DC, Jensen argued that “IQ and academic achievement are only related because, for reasons X, Y, and Z (pick your own environmental variables), some folks get more out of school, and it just so happens that the same folks do well on IQ tests due largely (if not entirely) because school achievement and IQ tests are measuring the same thing”.

On the other hand, Angela L. Duckworth, a professor at the Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvania, explained that "Underachievement among American youth is often blamed on inadequate teachers, boring textbooks, and large class sizes. We suggest another reason for students falling short of their intellectual potential: their failure to exercise self-discipline”

This document therefore seeks to present a synthesis and review of the various scientific experiments, social research and analysis which have been performed by a number of creditable professionals in the field of educational psychology to illustrate and further establish the perfect ground for further studies in this field. Explaining his perspective on the relationship between intelligence quotients and academic performance from both a practical and experimental perspective, Kevin McGrew explained that a student’s academic achievement begins with his attitude to academic self-efficacy. Thus, the student must develop a personal belief about the nature and level of the academic competence. This principle follows from normal common sense analogy that a student in the high school level could only be able to achieve academically when there is the self conviction that he or she is academically intelligent. “Once students have developed a clear and coherent understanding of ability, the particular conception of ability they adopt will determine a great deal about their motivational patterns.” (Kevin, 2008).

Once the student has been able to identify the academic competence Marley W. Watkins further explained the next level of analysis in his article on Psychometric intelligence and achievement where he explained that “intelligence, as measured by the Verbal Comprehension and Perceptual Organization dimensions influences or is related to future achievement whereas reading and math achievement do not appear to influence or are not related to future psychometric intelligence”. It is evident enough that one cannot measure a high school student’s perceptual organization by considering the attitude to self discipline. Such social issues require an understanding of the organizational concept and verbal comprehension which is influenced by the level of once intelligence quotient.

The theoretical belief that academic achievement is influenced by intelligence was proven through Dr Deary’s experiment which looked at how “cognitive ability measured at age 11 predicted academic achievements at age 16. Unsurprisingly, the IQ-Achievement correlations for the Sciences are around 6 (math highest, chemistry lowest), with similar coefficients form Arts/Humanities and Social Studies at age 16”. (Deary, 2003). Holding a contradicting view on the issue of what determines the academic achievement of most high school students, Angela L. Duckworth...
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