Self Assessment

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Abstract
Emotional Intelligence is the ability to perceive and express emotion, assimilate emotion in thought, understand, and reason with emotion, and regulate in self and others. It provides the bedrock for the development of a large number of competences that helps people perform more effectively. There are four domains of Emotional Intelligence and they are Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, and Relationship Management; within these domains they have 18 competences (Cherniss & Goleman, 2001). This paper will provide an self-assessment review of emotional intelligence theory based on my experiences, present understanding, and future goals; using the four domains of emotional intelligence and all 18 competencies to research, analyze, synthesize, and report my current strengths and weaknesses.

Emotional Intelligence: Self-Assessment Review
Emotional Intelligence is important for organizations as well as individuals, but the main perception of emotional intelligence is that it is a learned skill. In an article written by She Liu, he asked “Can Emotional Intelligence be learned and retained?” The answer to this question is yes emotional intelligence can be learned or retained (Get in Touch With Emotions, 2010). According to an international journal, The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Employee Work Engagement Behavior, it states that “Emotional Intelligence plays an important role in helping the managers and employees to cope with this dynamic change in the business environment. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while other claim it is an inborn characteristic. Employees need to enhance their emotional intelligence skills, apart from technical skills, which in turn will enhance their productivity on the job” (Ravichandran, Arasu, & Kumar, 2011, p. 157).

Emotional Intelligence is the ability to perceive and express emotion, assimilate emotion in thought, understand, and reason with emotion, and regulate in self and others as stated by Cherniss and Goleman (2001) in the Emotionally Intelligent Workplace. I realized before I can develop Emotional Intelligence, first, I need to ask myself what I want and how do I want individuals to perceive me through my emotions and my abilities. I will have to evaluate myself, knowing what my strengths and weaknesses are and develop supportive and trusting relationships with other individuals who will make changes possible. To make this possible I will have to do a self-assessment of the four domains of Emotional Intelligence, they are Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, and Relationship Management. According to article by Golnaz Sadri, he stated that, “Emotional intelligence (EI) relates to numerous skills, such as the ability to motivate oneself, the ability to regulate one's moods and delay gratification, and the ability to empathize and work well with other people. While there are many models of EI, it essentially relates to four dimensions of skills and behaviors: a person's ability to understand her own behavior, to regulate her own behavior, to understand other people's behavior, and to regulate other people's behavior” (Emotional Intelligence: Can It Be Taught, 2011, p. 84). Self-Awareness

Self-Awareness helps individuals to handle their own emotional reactions better. It is the first of the four domains of Emotional Intelligence used to identify the weaknesses and strengths of an individual. Self-Awareness reflects the importance of recognizing one’s feelings and how they affect one’s performance. It does not matter where I work, who I work with or how many individuals are on my team; as an Administrative Assistant, I have realized that my communication skills are important to both my success and the success of the organization in which I work. As explained in the article, Emotional Intelligence: Can It Be Taught, it states that “Self-awareness is...
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