Research Critique: Effects of Gender on the Health

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Research Critique: Effects of Gender on the Health and Development of Medically At-Risk Infants Kimberly Baird
Grand Canyon University
Introduction to Nursing Research
NRS 433
Sonya Williams
April 28, 2011

Research Critique: Effects of Gender on the Health and Development of Medically At-Risk Infants

Gender has been shown to have a considerable impact on the health and development of infants with boys showing greater vulnerability. Boys show a greater prevalence for prematurity, are more likely to be intubated at birth, have lower Apgar scores, and other neonatal complications. They also show a greater incidence of Respiratory Distress Syndrome and chronic lung disease. The risk for neonatal and perinatal morbidity is 20% higher for boys than for girls. This is important for nursing so that early and advanced developmental screening tests can be planned for this at-risk group early to minimize the risk of long term deficits (Cho, Holditch-Davis, & Miles, 2010). The purpose of this study is significant to nursing in that it identifies an especially vulnerable population of neonates and the increased needs of this population. This group of medically at-risk infants should be more closely monitored and followed with regular developmental screenings and frequent visits to the pediatrician in order to identify areas in which they may be lacking in development. Families of these infants need education regarding cognitive and motor development and guidelines of when their child should reach specific milestones. These families also need a plan to assist their child in attaining these milestones. The research objective in this study examined gender-differentiated health, cognitive, motor and language development among medically at-risk infants. This study used a longitudinal descriptive and comparative secondary analysis to study the differences between gender and overall health and...
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