Development from 0-19

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Development from 0-19
Staff Guide
Diane Koplewsky March 2013
(review March 2014)
CU2936 1.1

Staff Guide to child development from 0-19 (to be used with other published guidance) 1

Introduction
This is a quick reference tool for the developmental processes from birth to 19 years.
This should be used in conjunction with other reference material to aid with observations. The Children's (NI) Order 1995 and subsequent guidance stresses the importance of observing, recording, assessing, evaluating and reporting.

Observing formalises the link between theory and practice. It provides an understanding of child development and helps aid parents, carers and ourselves to be aware of any issues surrounding late development or non development. As early years professionals we must be aware that not all children develop at the same rate (these are only guidelines) and we should ensure that our planning and daily routine is based around aiding stages of development whilst stretching these for individual children where necessary. It is also a useful tool to ensure that referrals can be made to outside professionals where assistance may be required, eg speech therapy. It is particularly important that we are recording observations and procedures are followed for reporting where children are not meeting developmental milestones. Early intervention is often crucial. A more detailed guide will be used for Babies to Three (This is me! Early Years Publication to aid with observation). Should you have any queries regarding ages and stages of development or how you should link this to your daily routine and planning please speak with me at any point.

Diane Koplewsky March 2013 Developmental Guide 0-19

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Physical Development
By six months
Turn their head toward sounds and movement
Watch an adult's face when feeding
Smile at familiar faces and voices
Reach up to hold feet when lying on their backs
Look and reach for objects
Hold and shake a rattle
Put everything in their mouths
Between six months and one year
Move from sitting with support to sitting alone
Roll over from their tummy to their back
Begin to creep, crawl or shuffle on their bottom
Pull on or push against adult hands or furniture to reach a standing position
Raises arms to be lifted
Turn and look up when they hear their name
Pat and poke objects when playing
Pass objects from hand to hand
Look for things that have been hidden or dropped
Reaches hand towards source of food

Between one and two years
Begin to walk
Sits alone indefinitely
Feed themselves
Push and pull toys while walking
Wave goodbye
Point or make noises to indicate wants
Enjoy a picture book
Shake head for 'No'
Uses thumb and first two fingers to grip
Bangs objects together
Crawl upstairs
Stoops to pick things up from the floor
Begins to show preference for one hand
Builds tower of few bricks
Holds crayon in palm and makes marks on paper

Diane Koplewsky March 2013 Developmental Guide 0-19

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Between one and two years
Kneels to play
Throws
Kicks ball
Builds larger brick tower
Pour liquids
Uses pencil to make marks and circular scribbles
Three years
Jumps with feet together
Walks on tip toes
Walks up and down stairs
Catches a gently thrown ball
Climbs with increasing confidence
Paints
Threads beads on a lace
Gains control over eating tools
Four years
Pedals
Throws with aim
Uses scissors
Holds a pencil and can draw people/houses
Five years
Hops
Kicks with aim
Catches ball
Handles pencil with control
Copy shapes and write some letters
Sews stitches
Between six and seven
Skips
Rides bicycle
Jumps from height
Climbs confidently
Writes
Threads needle
Can do buttons, shoe laces
Between eight and twelve
Run, jump, skip,
hit a ball,
climb and swing
Enjoy playing team games by age eight
May misjudge their ability before age nine
Diane Koplewsky March 2013 Developmental Guide 0-19

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Adolescence from 13-19
Young people...
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