Project Manager & Is Manager

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Table of Contents

Chapter-1: Introduction 2-3
Introductionto Project Manager2
Responsibilities of A Project Manager3

Chapter-2: Project Manager & Arguments4-6
As A Project Manager4
Priorities Make Things Happen5
Common ordered lists 6-8
Things Happen When One Say No 9
Keeping It Real 10
Know the Critical Path11
Be Relentless 12
Be Savvy13

Chapter-3: IS Manager & Answering14-16
As A IS Manager14
Answering15-16

Chapter-4: Recommendation & Conclusion17-18
Recommendation & Conclusion17
Reference18

Chapter-1: Introduction

Introduction to Project Manager

A project manager is the person responsible for accomplishing the stated project objectives. Key project management responsibilities include creating clear and attainable project objectives, building the project requirements, and managing the triple constraint for projects, which are cost, time, and quality (also known as scope).A project manager is often a client representative and has to determine and implement the exact needs of the client, based on knowledge of the firm they are representing. The ability to adapt to the various internal procedures of the contracting party, and to form close links with the nominated representatives, is essential in ensuring that the key issues of cost, time, quality and above all, client satisfaction, can be realized. The term and title 'project manager' has come to be used generically to describe anyone given responsibility to complete a project. However, it is more properly used to describe a person with full responsibility and the same level of authority required to complete a project. If a person does not have high levels of both responsibility and authority then they are better described as a project administrator, coordinator, facilitator or expeditor. Responsibilities Of A Project Manager

The specific responsibilities of the Project Manager vary depending on the industry, the company size, the company maturity, and the company culture. However, there are some responsibilities that are common to all Project Managers:

a. Developing the project plan
b. Managing the project stakeholders
c. Managing the project team
d. Managing the project risk
e. Managing the project schedule
f. Managing the project budget
g. Managing the project conflicts

Chapter-2: Project Manager & Arguments

As a Project Manager

One myth of project management is that certain people have an innate ability to do it well, and others do not. Whenever this myth came up in conversation with other project managers, I always asked for an explanation of that ability—how to recognize it, categorize it, and, if possible, develop it in others. After discussion and debate, the only thing we usually identified—is the ability to make things happen. Some people are able to apply their skills and talents in whatever combination necessary to move projects forward, and others cannot, even if they have the same or superior individual skills. The ability to make things happen is a combination of knowing how to be a catalyst or driver in a variety of different situations, and having the courage to do so. This ability to drive is so important to some that it's used as a litmus test in hiring project managers. Even if IS manager can't precisely define what the ability is without making at least some references to other skills, they do feel that they can sense or measure it in others. For example, an interviewer needs to ask herself the following question about the candidate: "If things were not going well on some important part of the project, would I feel confident sending this person...
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