Perception

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Eye, Retina, Photoreceptor cell
  • Pages : 4 (1117 words )
  • Download(s) : 145
  • Published : March 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Perception and the Perceptual Process
The Perceptual Process
The perceptual process is a sequence of steps that begins with the environment and leads to our perception of a stimulus and an action in response to the stimulus. This process is continual, but you do not spend a great deal of time thinking about the actual process that occurs when you perceive the many stimuli that surround you at any given moment. The process of transforming the light that falls on your retinas into an actual visual image happens unconsciously and automatically. The subtle changes in pressure against your skin that allow you to feel object occur without a single thought. In order to fully understand how the perception process works, we'll start by breaking down each step. The Steps in the Perceptual Process

1.The Environmental Stimulus
2.The Attended Stimulus
3.The Image on the Retina
4.Transduction
5.Neural Processing
6.Perception
7.Recognition
8.Action

1. The Environmental Stimulus
The world is full of stimuli that can attract our attention through various senses. The environmental stimulus is everything in our environment that has the potential to be perceived. This might include anything that can be seen, touched, tasted, smelled or heard. It might also involve the sense of proprioception, such as the movements of the arms and legs or the change in position of the body in relation to objects in the environment. For example, imagine that you are out on a morning jog at your local park. As you perform your workout, there are a wide variety of environmental stimuli that might capture your attention. The tree branches are swaying in the slight breeze; a man is out on the grass playing fetch with his Golden Retriever; a car drives past with the windows rolled down and the music blaring; a duck splashes in a nearby pond. All of these things represent the environmental stimuli, serving as a starting point...
tracking img