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How to Effect Successful Cross-culture Communication
Purpose:
This paper aims to talk about cross-culture communication and find ways to effect successful communication between different countries, which have different culture background, history, convention .etc. As we all know, language plays a decisive role when communicate with others but the diversity in language and culture makes cross-culture communication a highly risky mission. To complete this almost impossible mission in the ensuing passages, I will first introduce some basic elements concerning communication. Then, a group of case studies collected from diverse cultural settings will be present. It is hoped that these cases present the vivid picture, show us some basic rules to effect successful communication between different countries. 1. Some basic elements which we should know about cross-culture communication Culture and communication

Culture and communication, although two different concepts, are directly linked. Culture is learned, acted out, transmitted, and preserved through communication. Communication, our ability to share our ideas and feelings, is the basis of all human contact. Some basic principles in communication so that a healthier discourse pattern can be adopted. Try to look at things from other persons’ point of view. try to sense their feeling to a given issue.

try to understand their way of knowing the world.
2 What can go wrong?
People from different cultures encode and decode messages differently, increasing the chances of misunderstanding, so the safety-first consequence of recognizing cultural differences should be to assume that everyone's thoughts and actions are not just like ours. Such assumptions stem from potentially devastating ignorance and can lead to much frustration for members of both cultures. Entering a culture with this type of ethnocentrism, the assumption your own culture is correct, is another byproduct of ignorance and cultural misunderstanding. Main types of misunderstanding are: rights, values, and needs Some cultural characteristics will be easy to identify, e.g. whether people are conscious of status or make displays of material wealth. But many rights are assumed, values are implied, and needs are unspoken, (e.g. for safety, security, love, a sense of belonging to a group, self-esteem, and the ability to attain one's goals). For example, issues of personal security, dignity, and control will be very different as between an abled and a disabled person. Similarly, there may be problems of respect when a person from a rigidly class-based culture meets a meritocrat, or where there is racism, sexism or religious intolerance in play. In such situations, identity is fundamental when disputing the proper role or "place" of the other, about who is in control of their lives, and how they present themselves to the outside world. But the reality is more deeply rooted in power relationships: about who is on top of the social, economic, and/or political hierarchy. Family members or long term rivals may be obsessed with their mutual competition. The relationships between racial or ethnic groups may be affected by economic jealousy. Nations may assert that their political systems are superior. Such conflicts are difficult to resolve because no-one wants to be the loser, and few are willing to share the winnings. Stereotyping can aggravate these problems and prevent people from realising that there is another way to interpret a situation, or that other groups may define their rights in a different way. Hence, what may appear just or fair to one group can often seem unjust to an opposing group. 3 Improving Intercultural Communication

It is essential that people research the cultures and communication conventions of those whom they propose to meet. This will minimise the risk of making the elementary mistakes. It is also prudent to set a clear agenda so that everyone understands the...
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