Old Joe Case Report

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In the spring of 2012, our management group, group 7, was assigned to take over a business as top level management. With the only guideline of creating a drastically more capable and profitable organization within a year, we had a lot of work ahead. The business belonged to Old Joe, an absolute genius engineer who was lacking in business management skills, Fred, a failed engineer with underlying personal issues resulting in counterproductive activity, and Netty, Old Joe’s wife. This division of the business specializes in the creation of medical products, and has customers globally. The backwards situation the business was in cannot be overstated. There was a huge set of order back logs, quality problems, inventory issues, social and culture problems within the company, and several others. With the business in such a dire state, we began our work.

Organization Chart Opening Day

Q1
* Establish Positions as boss by doing 2 things:
* Introduce ourselves to all the current managers
* Sending out a warning shot by giving the managers a one hour time frame to try and settle their differences. * This will make it clear to the managers that henceforth there will be no tolerance for social bickering. * Begin working on the delinquent backorders worth roughly $16million. By the end of quarter one, at least 70% of the orders will be complete. A lot of overtime is going to be required for this to happen. This will address problem #3. * Fire Yolanda. She is simply terrible. This will address problem #10. * Demand that Bob apply himself better for job related issues. However, knowing that he is going to strive to work against the company goals, the extraction of information from Bob will be the goal. Once this is done, Bob will also be fired, which is roughly after 40 days. Promote a well qualified worker to bobs position * Hire a new Human Resources Manager (HRM) to replace Yolanda. The new HRM, Jenny, will be given 2-3 weeks to settle in, and get to know what the state of the company is, and what is required on his part. * We need to start on the paycheck errors right away. Unfortunately, we don’t believe we have the time to fix the problem all together, but we can reduce the amount of errors. We need to reduce the 3 way to “punch in” into one single method. We feel that written time cards would be the best way for now. It is quick and can be managed quite easily. We need to have the person fill out their time card which must be legible. If the time card is not legible, then the employee doesn’t get paid for that week until they can prove they worked those hours. The time card must be then signed and reviewed by a supervisor to make sure there are no errors on it. We can then hold the employee and the supervisor accountable for any errors that occur. This can even go through the new HR if problems still occur. This will address problem #15. * We need to have Ed work closely with the new HR that we hired to keep the paycheck errors under control. We are in a position where we need to first minimize the problem, until we have the time and resource to completely fix it. This will address problem #15. * Fred gets put on tight leash right away and given no leeway. His job will be laid out for him step by step and to ensure he is doing his job, we would keep up to date on his problems. Fred will have to answer forecasts directly to us and he will not be allowed on the production floor. That way he won’t be down yelling at people and he’ll be more focused on his job. Fred is high in the company and should know how to do his job even though he is not trained for his position. We will keep tabs on Fred ourselves and give him no leeway. I expect him to be a big part of this company getting back on track and his forecasting will help immensely. This will let him know he’s on thin ice and make him work harder. He should know how to make a sales forecast so we will push...
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